Bahanovich and Collopy (2009)

From Copyright EVIDENCE

Advertising Architectural Publishing of books, periodicals and other publishing Programming and broadcasting Computer programming Computer consultancy Creative, arts and entertainment Cultural education

Film and motion pictures Sound recording and music publishing Photographic activities PR and communication Software publishing (including video games) Specialised design Television programmes Translation and interpretation

1. Relationship between protection (subject matter/term/scope) and supply/economic development/growth/welfare 2. Relationship between creative process and protection - what motivates creators (e.g. attribution; control; remuneration; time allocation)? 3. Harmony of interest assumption between authors and publishers (creators and producers/investors) 4. Effects of protection on industry structure (e.g. oligopolies; competition; economics of superstars; business models; technology adoption) 5. Understanding consumption/use (e.g. determinants of unlawful behaviour; user-generated content; social media)

A. Nature and Scope of exclusive rights (hyperlinking/browsing; reproduction right) B. Exceptions (distinguish innovation and public policy purposes; open-ended/closed list; commercial/non-commercial distinction) C. Mass digitisation/orphan works (non-use; extended collective licensing) D. Licensing and Business models (collecting societies; meta data; exchanges/hubs; windowing; crossborder availability) E. Fair remuneration (levies; copyright contracts) F. Enforcement (quantifying infringement; criminal sanctions; intermediary liability; graduated response; litigation and court data; commercial/non-commercial distinction; education and awareness)

Source Details

Bahanovich and Collopy (2009)
Title: Music experience and behaviour in young people
Author(s): Bahanovich, D., Collopy, D.
Year: 2009
Citation: Bahanovich, D., & Colloy, D. (2009). Music experience and behaviour in young people: 2009 National Survey. UK Music.
Link(s): Definitive , Open Access
Key Related Studies:
Discipline:
Linked by: Collopy, Bastian, Drye, Koempel, Lewis, Jenner (2014)
About the Data
Data Description: The findings are based on a large-scale survey of 1808 UK respondents. The sample included a representative mix of all ages within the target demographic and originated from all over the UK.
Data Type: Primary and Secondary data
Secondary Data Sources:
Data Collection Methods:
Data Analysis Methods:
Industry(ies):
Country(ies):
Cross Country Study?: No
Comparative Study?: Yes
Literature review?: No
Government or policy study?: No
Time Period(s) of Collection:
  • 2009
Funder(s):
  • UK Music

Abstract

This study examines the music consumption habits of 14-24 year olds across the UK. The findings are based on a comprehensive survey of 1808 UK respondents sourced via youth groups, secondary schools and universities as well as through media and social network and music partners such as the NME, Bebo, We7, Facebook and MySpace. According to the results, young people have large collections of digital music, some of which is acquired through the growing range of licensed digital music stores. However, they still want to own music on physical formats. Music remains the most popular form of entertainment among respondents, but there is a value gap between the popularity of music and the amount of money spent on it, especially compared to other forms of entertainment. The high popularity of filesharing remains unchanged since 2008, the main reason for it being that it is free. Another significant finding of the study is that the vast majority of respondents know that sharing copyrighted content is not legal, but continue to do so.

Main Results of the Study

  • The computer is now the main entertainment hub amongst respondents in the group under study. The vast majority of respondents have huge digital music collections (the average computer or hard drive contains over 8,000 tracks).
  • Ownership is important. This is true both online and offline. Young people are using the growing range of licensed digital music stores and they still want to own music on physical formats.
  • Music remains their most popular form of entertainment. However, there remains a significant "value gap" between the popularity of music and the amount of money spent on it, especially compared to other entertainment types.
  • The popularity of filesharing remains unchanged since the previous year (2008). The main reason for filesharing is that it is free. However, most respondents are partially prepared to pay for digital music and would be interested in paying for an unlimited, all-you-can-eat MP3 download service.
  • The vast majority of respondents knew that sharing copyrighted content is not legal, but they continue to do so.


Policy Implications as Stated By Author

In view of the impact of digital in the music industry, UK Music needs to continue seeking external support and to continue working with ISPs and government to re-evaluate their education strategy and to strengthen their business-to-business relationships.

Coverage of Study

Coverage of Fundamental Issues
Issue Included within Study
Relationship between protection (subject matter/term/scope) and supply/economic development/growth/welfare
Green-tick.png
Relationship between creative process and protection - what motivates creators (e.g. attribution; control; remuneration; time allocation)?
Harmony of interest assumption between authors and publishers (creators and producers/investors)
Effects of protection on industry structure (e.g. oligopolies; competition; economics of superstars; business models; technology adoption)
Understanding consumption/use (e.g. determinants of unlawful behaviour; user-generated content; social media)
Green-tick.png
Coverage of Evidence Based Policies
Issue Included within Study
Nature and Scope of exclusive rights (hyperlinking/browsing; reproduction right)
Exceptions (distinguish innovation and public policy purposes; open-ended/closed list; commercial/non-commercial distinction)
Mass digitisation/orphan works (non-use; extended collective licensing)
Licensing and Business models (collecting societies; meta data; exchanges/hubs; windowing; crossborder availability)
Fair remuneration (levies; copyright contracts)
Green-tick.png
Enforcement (quantifying infringement; criminal sanctions; intermediary liability; graduated response; litigation and court data; commercial/non-commercial distinction; education and awareness)
Green-tick.png

Datasets

Sample size: 1808
Level of aggregation: Individual
Period of material under study: 2009