Bryce and Rutter (2005)

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1. Relationship between protection (subject matter/term/scope) and supply/economic development/growth/welfare 2. Relationship between creative process and protection - what motivates creators (e.g. attribution; control; remuneration; time allocation)? 3. Harmony of interest assumption between authors and publishers (creators and producers/investors) 4. Effects of protection on industry structure (e.g. oligopolies; competition; economics of superstars; business models; technology adoption) 5. Understanding consumption/use (e.g. determinants of unlawful behaviour; user-generated content; social media)

A. Nature and Scope of exclusive rights (hyperlinking/browsing; reproduction right) B. Exceptions (distinguish innovation and public policy purposes; open-ended/closed list; commercial/non-commercial distinction) C. Mass digitisation/orphan works (non-use; extended collective licensing) D. Licensing and Business models (collecting societies; meta data; exchanges/hubs; windowing; crossborder availability) E. Fair remuneration (levies; copyright contracts) F. Enforcement (quantifying infringement; criminal sanctions; intermediary liability; graduated response; litigation and court data; commercial/non-commercial distinction; education and awareness)

Source Details

Bryce and Rutter (2005)
Title: Fake Nation? A study into an everyday crime.
Author(s): Bryce, J., Rutter, J.
Year: 2005
Citation: Bryce, J., & Rutter, J. (2005). Fake Nation? A study into an everyday crime. The Intellectual Property Theft and Organised Crime research project, UK.
Link(s): Definitive , Open Access
Key Related Studies:
Discipline:
Linked by:
About the Data
Data Description: The project utilised both qualitative and quantitative methods – over 2,000 people were questioned using a postal and web-based questionnaire. In addition, nine focus groups were held. This enabled the development of a detailed examination of consumer perspectives on IP crime, including counterfeiting and downloading which combines both deep (qualitative) and broad (quantitative) methodologies and associated forms of data.
Data Type: Primary data
Secondary Data Sources:
Data Collection Methods:
Data Analysis Methods:
Industry(ies):
Country(ies):
Cross Country Study?: No
Comparative Study?: Yes
Literature review?: No
Government or policy study?: Yes
Time Period(s) of Collection:
  • 2005
Funder(s):
  • Organised Crime Task Force
  • British Video Association (BVA)
  • British Phonographic Industry
  • Business Software Alliance
  • Entertainment & Leisure Software Publishers Association
  • Federation Against Copyright Theft
  • The Patent Office

Abstract

This publication details the background, empirical and analytical research undertaken during the Intellectual Property Theft and Organised Crime research project (IPTOC) and provides a robust insight into contemporary consumption of counterfeit/pirated goods and illegal downloading in England and Northern Ireland. The research outlined in this report is premised upon the belief that while significant attention has been placed upon developing technical solutions to prevent the copying of products (eg digital rights managements, holograms, and increased complexity of product design) and analysis of legal and policy issues relating to copyright and intellectual property theft (IPT), there remains a significant lack of research investigating demand side/consumption aspects of the counterfeiting market. The results of the project demonstrate that the consumption of counterfeit, pirated and other fake goods is a common, widespread and normalised practice to those who purchase them and that this presents a significant challenge to the government, affected industries and enforcement agencies. This summary is divided into two parts. The first provides a general summary of the research and key findings of the IPTOC project. The second provides a series of more focused ‘datasheets’ which concentrate on providing an overview of the project results on an industry sector by sector basis.

Main Results of the Study

  • Level of public awareness of counterfeit and pirated goods is high.
  • Consumption of fake goods is fairly common across the UK.
  • Counterfeit goods are available through a variety of locations and networks.
  • Cost is a key driver for the purchase of fake goods.
  • Purchases are not solely based around economic decisions.
  • Fake goods often meet expectations.
  • The public are aware that counterfeiting and piracy impacts on the public purse.
  • Good appreciation of the consequences that counterfeiting and piracy has for legitimate business.
  • Degree of ambivalence about the dangers of some fake goods.
  • Messages need to be explained more fully.
  • Law enforcement action against the producers of fake products is sending out an effective message.
  • Previous campaigns have made an impact.

Policy Implications as Stated By Author

None stated.



Coverage of Study

Coverage of Fundamental Issues
Issue Included within Study
Relationship between protection (subject matter/term/scope) and supply/economic development/growth/welfare
Relationship between creative process and protection - what motivates creators (e.g. attribution; control; remuneration; time allocation)?
Harmony of interest assumption between authors and publishers (creators and producers/investors)
Effects of protection on industry structure (e.g. oligopolies; competition; economics of superstars; business models; technology adoption)
Understanding consumption/use (e.g. determinants of unlawful behaviour; user-generated content; social media)
Green-tick.png
Coverage of Evidence Based Policies
Issue Included within Study
Nature and Scope of exclusive rights (hyperlinking/browsing; reproduction right)
Exceptions (distinguish innovation and public policy purposes; open-ended/closed list; commercial/non-commercial distinction)
Mass digitisation/orphan works (non-use; extended collective licensing)
Licensing and Business models (collecting societies; meta data; exchanges/hubs; windowing; crossborder availability)
Fair remuneration (levies; copyright contracts)
Enforcement (quantifying infringement; criminal sanctions; intermediary liability; graduated response; litigation and court data; commercial/non-commercial distinction; education and awareness)
Green-tick.png

Datasets

Sample size: 9
Level of aggregation: Focus Groups
Period of material under study: 2005


Sample size: 2388
Level of aggregation: Individual
Period of material under study: 2005