Coyle, Gould, Gupta and Gupta (2009)

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1. Relationship between protection (subject matter/term/scope) and supply/economic development/growth/welfare 2. Relationship between creative process and protection - what motivates creators (e.g. attribution; control; remuneration; time allocation)? 3. Harmony of interest assumption between authors and publishers (creators and producers/investors) 4. Effects of protection on industry structure (e.g. oligopolies; competition; economics of superstars; business models; technology adoption) 5. Understanding consumption/use (e.g. determinants of unlawful behaviour; user-generated content; social media)

A. Nature and Scope of exclusive rights (hyperlinking/browsing; reproduction right) B. Exceptions (distinguish innovation and public policy purposes; open-ended/closed list; commercial/non-commercial distinction) C. Mass digitisation/orphan works (non-use; extended collective licensing) D. Licensing and Business models (collecting societies; meta data; exchanges/hubs; windowing; crossborder availability) E. Fair remuneration (levies; copyright contracts) F. Enforcement (quantifying infringement; criminal sanctions; intermediary liability; graduated response; litigation and court data; commercial/non-commercial distinction; education and awareness)

Source Details

Coyle, Gould, Gupta and Gupta (2009)
Title: "To buy or to pirate": The matrix of music consumers' acquisition-mode decision-making
Author(s): Coyle, J. R., Gould, S. J., Gupta, P., Gupta, R.
Year: 2009
Citation: Coyle, J. R., Gould, S. J., Gupta, P., & Gupta, R. (2009). “To buy or to pirate”: The matrix of music consumers' acquisition-mode decision-making. Journal of Business Research, 62(10), 1031-1037.
Link(s): Definitive , Open Access
Key Related Studies:
Discipline:
Linked by: Hansen and Walden (2012)
About the Data
Data Description: A sample consisted of 204 undergraduate students drawn from the population of a large Midwestern University.
Data Type: Primary data
Secondary Data Sources:
Data Collection Methods:
Data Analysis Methods:
Industry(ies):
Country(ies):
Cross Country Study?: No
Comparative Study?: No
Literature review?: No
Government or policy study?: No
Time Period(s) of Collection:
  • 2009
Funder(s):
  • None

Abstract

The decision to engage in music piracy may be preceded by consumer consideration of a range of issues. The determinants of such piracy as embedded in a large matrix of acquisition-mode decision factors relevant to exchange theory, including economic, legal, ethical, network and consumer behavior aspects, are investigated here. This matrix depicts numerous interrelated factors and makes assessing the decision-making process regarding music piracy more contextual than previously considered. A study of 204 American business students was conducted to test this matrix and assess the impact of the various factors. Implications and future research regarding this decision-making matrix and exchange theory are provided. The significant factors predict whether an exchange takes place between music consumers and the music industry.

Main Results of the Study

This article shows that:

  • male respondents, younger respondents, and respondents with less household income were more likely to intend to pirate music.
  • It also shows that respondents who had pirated in the past, who indicated an increase in the amount of music they were downloading legally, and whose level of music purchase had decreased, were more likely to intend to pirate music.
  • Ultimately, People who do not consider piracy to be an important ethical or legal issue, who distinguished between different kinds of music piracy when considering the ethicality of piracy, who believed consumers, musicians, and record labels benefited from music piracy, and who perceive little risk in engaging in music piracy, were more likely to indicate an intention to pirate music.

Policy Implications as Stated By Author

- The recording industry might develop communications that emphasize specific ramifications (e.g., piracy is particularly harmful to up-and-coming artists) to piracy and benefits to participating in legal music downloading (e.g., sample music at low cost).

- It might use lesser-known musicians to explain how piracy hurts their ability to make a living may be more effective.



Coverage of Study

Coverage of Fundamental Issues
Issue Included within Study
Relationship between protection (subject matter/term/scope) and supply/economic development/growth/welfare
Relationship between creative process and protection - what motivates creators (e.g. attribution; control; remuneration; time allocation)?
Harmony of interest assumption between authors and publishers (creators and producers/investors)
Effects of protection on industry structure (e.g. oligopolies; competition; economics of superstars; business models; technology adoption)
Understanding consumption/use (e.g. determinants of unlawful behaviour; user-generated content; social media)
Green-tick.png
Coverage of Evidence Based Policies
Issue Included within Study
Nature and Scope of exclusive rights (hyperlinking/browsing; reproduction right)
Exceptions (distinguish innovation and public policy purposes; open-ended/closed list; commercial/non-commercial distinction)
Mass digitisation/orphan works (non-use; extended collective licensing)
Licensing and Business models (collecting societies; meta data; exchanges/hubs; windowing; crossborder availability)
Fair remuneration (levies; copyright contracts)
Enforcement (quantifying infringement; criminal sanctions; intermediary liability; graduated response; litigation and court data; commercial/non-commercial distinction; education and awareness)
Green-tick.png

Datasets

Sample size: 204
Level of aggregation: University students
Period of material under study: 2009