D'Astous, Colbert and Montpetit (2005)

From Copyright EVIDENCE

Advertising Architectural Publishing of books, periodicals and other publishing Programming and broadcasting Computer programming Computer consultancy Creative, arts and entertainment Cultural education

Film and motion pictures Sound recording and music publishing Photographic activities PR and communication Software publishing (including video games) Specialised design Television programmes Translation and interpretation

1. Relationship between protection (subject matter/term/scope) and supply/economic development/growth/welfare 2. Relationship between creative process and protection - what motivates creators (e.g. attribution; control; remuneration; time allocation)? 3. Harmony of interest assumption between authors and publishers (creators and producers/investors) 4. Effects of protection on industry structure (e.g. oligopolies; competition; economics of superstars; business models; technology adoption) 5. Understanding consumption/use (e.g. determinants of unlawful behaviour; user-generated content; social media)

A. Nature and Scope of exclusive rights (hyperlinking/browsing; reproduction right) B. Exceptions (distinguish innovation and public policy purposes; open-ended/closed list; commercial/non-commercial distinction) C. Mass digitisation/orphan works (non-use; extended collective licensing) D. Licensing and Business models (collecting societies; meta data; exchanges/hubs; windowing; crossborder availability) E. Fair remuneration (levies; copyright contracts) F. Enforcement (quantifying infringement; criminal sanctions; intermediary liability; graduated response; litigation and court data; commercial/non-commercial distinction; education and awareness)

Source Details

D'Astous, Colbert and Montpetit (2005)
Title: Music piracy on the web - how effective are anti-piracy arguments? Evidence from the Theory of Planned Behaviour
Author(s): D'Astous, A., Colbert, F., Montpetit, D.
Year: 2005
Citation: d’Astous, A., Colbert, F., & Montpetit, D. (2005). Music piracy on the web–how effective are anti-piracy arguments? Evidence from the theory of planned behaviour. Journal of Consumer Policy, 28(3), 289-310.
Link(s): Definitive , Open Access
Key Related Studies:
Discipline:
Linked by: Chen and Yen (2011), Ingram and Hinduja (2008), Lysonski and Durvasula (2008)
About the Data
Data Description: A dataset of 139 business students from a large Canadian business school.
Data Type: Primary data
Secondary Data Sources:
Data Collection Methods:
Data Analysis Methods:
Industry(ies):
Country(ies):
Cross Country Study?: No
Comparative Study?: No
Literature review?: No
Government or policy study?: No
Time Period(s) of Collection:
  • 2005
Funder(s):
  • None

Abstract

This article presents the results of an experiment in which three different types of anti-piracy arguments were tested among 139 young adult consumers susceptible to engage in swapping music over the Internet: (1) stressing the negative personal consequences of pirating music, (2) stressing the negative consequences for the artists, and (3) stressing the unethical nature of this behaviour. The psychological determinants of music piracy behaviour were modeled in part with (1991) Ajzen’s theory of planned behaviour. The results show that the intention to swap music on-line depended on one’s attitude toward music piracy, one’s perception that important others want that this behaviour be performed, and one’s perceived competency in doing so. In addition, having swapped music on-line in the past had a strong influence on one’s intention to do it again. Contrary to expectations, the anti-piracy arguments had no significant impact on the behavioural dynamics underlying on-line music piracy.

Main Results of the Study

The framework presented in the article adds two variables to the original theory of planned behavior (Ajzen,2002), i.e., past behaviour and ethical predispositions, as well as some mediating effects, and it argues that:

  • The decision to engage in the illegal action of swapping music is founded on one’s attitude toward music piracy, one’s perception that important others want him or her to do so, and one’s perceived capabilities to actually perform this behaviour.
  • Having swapped music in the past appears to exert a strong influence on one’s intention to do it again.
  • The more a person thinks that music piracy is a normal, habitual behaviour, the more favourable his or her attitude toward this behaviour, and the greater the likelihood of engaging again in this behaviour.
  • This article also shows that the arguments that anti-piracy advocates use to convince consumers not to engage in this behaviour may not be as effective as some would think.

Policy Implications as Stated By Author

- Attempts at limiting the expansion of music piracy in the future should foremost target younger consumers.

- Strategies of making pirates aware of the negative consequences of their actions, or letting them know that their actions hurt the artists and the music industry, or stimulating their deep moral values, is going to change the situation will most likely have no impact on the mechanics through which attitudes toward and intentions to engage in music piracy unfold.

- The most important may be the inconsistency of the entire spectrum of messages that are sent to consumers.



Coverage of Study

Coverage of Fundamental Issues
Issue Included within Study
Relationship between protection (subject matter/term/scope) and supply/economic development/growth/welfare
Relationship between creative process and protection - what motivates creators (e.g. attribution; control; remuneration; time allocation)?
Harmony of interest assumption between authors and publishers (creators and producers/investors)
Effects of protection on industry structure (e.g. oligopolies; competition; economics of superstars; business models; technology adoption)
Understanding consumption/use (e.g. determinants of unlawful behaviour; user-generated content; social media)
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Coverage of Evidence Based Policies
Issue Included within Study
Nature and Scope of exclusive rights (hyperlinking/browsing; reproduction right)
Exceptions (distinguish innovation and public policy purposes; open-ended/closed list; commercial/non-commercial distinction)
Mass digitisation/orphan works (non-use; extended collective licensing)
Licensing and Business models (collecting societies; meta data; exchanges/hubs; windowing; crossborder availability)
Fair remuneration (levies; copyright contracts)
Enforcement (quantifying infringement; criminal sanctions; intermediary liability; graduated response; litigation and court data; commercial/non-commercial distinction; education and awareness)
Green-tick.png

Datasets

Sample size: 139
Level of aggregation: University students
Period of material under study: 2005