EY (2014)

From Copyright EVIDENCE

Advertising Architectural Publishing of books, periodicals and other publishing Programming and broadcasting Computer programming Computer consultancy Creative, arts and entertainment Cultural education

Film and motion pictures Sound recording and music publishing Photographic activities PR and communication Software publishing (including video games) Specialised design Television programmes Translation and interpretation

1. Relationship between protection (subject matter/term/scope) and supply/economic development/growth/welfare 2. Relationship between creative process and protection - what motivates creators (e.g. attribution; control; remuneration; time allocation)? 3. Harmony of interest assumption between authors and publishers (creators and producers/investors) 4. Effects of protection on industry structure (e.g. oligopolies; competition; economics of superstars; business models; technology adoption) 5. Understanding consumption/use (e.g. determinants of unlawful behaviour; user-generated content; social media)

A. Nature and Scope of exclusive rights (hyperlinking/browsing; reproduction right) B. Exceptions (distinguish innovation and public policy purposes; open-ended/closed list; commercial/non-commercial distinction) C. Mass digitisation/orphan works (non-use; extended collective licensing) D. Licensing and Business models (collecting societies; meta data; exchanges/hubs; windowing; crossborder availability) E. Fair remuneration (levies; copyright contracts) F. Enforcement (quantifying infringement; criminal sanctions; intermediary liability; graduated response; litigation and court data; commercial/non-commercial distinction; education and awareness)

Source Details

EY (2014)
Title: Creating Growth: Measuring Cultural and Creative Markets in the EU
Author(s): EY
Year: 2014
Citation: EY (2014) Creating Growth: Measuring Cultural and Creative Markets in the EU,
Link(s): Definitive , Open Access
Key Related Studies:
Discipline:
Linked by:
About the Data
Data Description: This study quantifies creative industries' contribution to the European economy, both in terms of direct impact (turnover) and employment, using data from 2011-2012.
Data Type: Secondary data
Secondary Data Sources:
Data Collection Methods:
Data Analysis Methods:
Industry(ies):
Country(ies):
Cross Country Study?: Yes
Comparative Study?: No
Literature review?: No
Government or policy study?: Yes
Time Period(s) of Collection:
  • 2013-2014
Funder(s):
  • European Grouping of Societies of Authors and Composers

Abstract

The main objective of this study is to produce a set of comparative and qualitative studies to give a snapshot of the economic role of CCIs in Europe and to show how, and to what extent, they may be a driving force for European economic growth. This report also aims to aid understanding of the contribution of creativity to other key industries.The study summarizes and builds upon available information on the economic scale of the cultural and creative sectors at both national and European levels. Though there have been many studies on the creative economy, a common definition has only very recently been agreed.

The report includes: • Comparative, qualitative and quantitative analyses aimed at understanding the economic role of the creative and cultural sectors in Europe • Key factors that will affect the global evolution of creative and cultural sectors and players • Ways by which creative and cultural activities can help encourage growth, youth employment and innovation and strengthen Europe’s position globally.

Main Results of the Study

  • Revenues of the 11 creative and cultural industry sectors total €535.9b, led by visual arts, advertising and TV.
  • The biggest employers among Europe’s CCIs were visual arts, performing arts and the music industry. They accounted for about half of the 7m CCI jobs in the EU in 2012. Creative activities contributed significantly to youth employment.
  • The regions that showed the highest concentrations of creative activities were those that proved to be most resilient during the post-2008 economic turmoil: London and Paris enjoying the highest concentrations of creative employment held up well, as did Rome, Stockholm, Madrid, Munich and Budapest, while mid-sized cities and rural areas suffered more. Partially thanks to this resilience, CCIs are increasingly viewed as a key component of local economic development.
  • Activities that rely heavily on intellectual property drive European growth and deliver 38.6% of EU GDP. Copyright-intensive activities, represented by the 11 sectors detailed in the report,

accounted for 4.2% of EU GDP in 2012.


Policy Implications as Stated By Author

The trends analysed in detail for the 11 creative markets must be taken into consideration in policy-making for each sector. In order to support the creative industries, they must have access to funding and to technology.


Coverage of Study

Coverage of Fundamental Issues
Issue Included within Study
Relationship between protection (subject matter/term/scope) and supply/economic development/growth/welfare
Green-tick.png
Relationship between creative process and protection - what motivates creators (e.g. attribution; control; remuneration; time allocation)?
Harmony of interest assumption between authors and publishers (creators and producers/investors)
Effects of protection on industry structure (e.g. oligopolies; competition; economics of superstars; business models; technology adoption)
Green-tick.png
Understanding consumption/use (e.g. determinants of unlawful behaviour; user-generated content; social media)
Coverage of Evidence Based Policies
Issue Included within Study
Nature and Scope of exclusive rights (hyperlinking/browsing; reproduction right)
Exceptions (distinguish innovation and public policy purposes; open-ended/closed list; commercial/non-commercial distinction)
Mass digitisation/orphan works (non-use; extended collective licensing)
Licensing and Business models (collecting societies; meta data; exchanges/hubs; windowing; crossborder availability)
Green-tick.png
Fair remuneration (levies; copyright contracts)
Enforcement (quantifying infringement; criminal sanctions; intermediary liability; graduated response; litigation and court data; commercial/non-commercial distinction; education and awareness)

Datasets

Sample size: 11
Level of aggregation: Creative industries
Period of material under study: 2011-2012