GfK Belgium (2015)

From Copyright EVIDENCE

Advertising Architectural Publishing of books, periodicals and other publishing Programming and broadcasting Computer programming Computer consultancy Creative, arts and entertainment Cultural education

Film and motion pictures Sound recording and music publishing Photographic activities PR and communication Software publishing (including video games) Specialised design Television programmes Translation and interpretation

1. Relationship between protection (subject matter/term/scope) and supply/economic development/growth/welfare 2. Relationship between creative process and protection - what motivates creators (e.g. attribution; control; remuneration; time allocation)? 3. Harmony of interest assumption between authors and publishers (creators and producers/investors) 4. Effects of protection on industry structure (e.g. oligopolies; competition; economics of superstars; business models; technology adoption) 5. Understanding consumption/use (e.g. determinants of unlawful behaviour; user-generated content; social media)

A. Nature and Scope of exclusive rights (hyperlinking/browsing; reproduction right) B. Exceptions (distinguish innovation and public policy purposes; open-ended/closed list; commercial/non-commercial distinction) C. Mass digitisation/orphan works (non-use; extended collective licensing) D. Licensing and Business models (collecting societies; meta data; exchanges/hubs; windowing; crossborder availability) E. Fair remuneration (levies; copyright contracts) F. Enforcement (quantifying infringement; criminal sanctions; intermediary liability; graduated response; litigation and court data; commercial/non-commercial distinction; education and awareness)

Source Details

GfK Belgium (2015)
Title: Provision of two online consumer surveys as support and evidence base to a Commission study:Identifying the main cross-border obstacles to the Digital Single Market and where they matter most
Author(s): GfK Belgium
Year: 2015
Citation: GfK Belgium, Provision of two online consumer surveys as support and evidence base to a Commission study: Identifying the main cross-border obstacles to the Digital Single Market and where they matter most
Link(s): Definitive , Open Access
Key Related Studies:
Discipline:
Linked by:
About the Data
Data Description: Two consumer surveys were conducted: 1) 22,848 socio-geographically representative consumers from throughout the EU filled out a self-reported survey on online purchasing habits and drivers and barriers to cross border purchasing; 2) 506 Polish consumers and 548 Belgian consumers had online activity tracked through Clickstream, as well as turned in two activity diaries a week for a minimum of two weeks.
Data Type: Primary data
Secondary Data Sources:
Data Collection Methods:
Data Analysis Methods:
Industry(ies):
Country(ies):
Cross Country Study?: Yes
Comparative Study?: No
Literature review?: No
Government or policy study?: Yes
Time Period(s) of Collection:
  • 2014-2015
Funder(s):
  • European Commission

Abstract

The present report was based on data collected within the scope of a wider investigation that feeds into one of the Commission’s top priorities: to create a borderless Digital Single Market (DSM) across Europe. The Commission’s DSM strategy for Europe, announced on May 6, 2015, aims to provide better access to tangible and digital goods and services, to create the right environment for the development and commercial success of digital innovation, and to maximise the growth of the digital economy across the EU28. As support and evidence base, two surveys of online consumers were carried out, looking particularly into their purchase activity for 12 types of tangible goods and offline services (e.g. clothes, travel services), usage of 4 types of online services (e.g. communication services) and access to 8 types of digital content (e.g. e-books). These included a core survey (covering online consumers from all EU28, Norway and Iceland) and a clickstream survey (targeted to online respondents from Belgium and Poland only who had expressed the intention to make at least one immediate online purchase). The main objectives of the study were: 1) to examine the current state of play of cross-border e-commerce in the EU28 and 2) to identify the main drivers and barriers to the proper functioning of a DSM across the EU.

Main Results of the Study

  • The total market value of the consumer segment of the Digital Single Market is estimated at ~ €231 billion. Tangible goods and offline services represent 92% of the total market value, with digital content and online services accounting for only 6% and 2%, respectively. The combined share of cross-border purchasing was one fifth (20%) of the total market value for tangible goods/offline services and digital content markets (14% inside the EU). * A much higher market penetration was observed for tangible goods and offline services when compared to online services and digital content. The proportion of EU28 online respondents who purchased tangible goods and offline services online at least once in the last 12 months was as high as 95%, whereas the corresponding proportions of respondents purchasing online services and digital content online were significantly smaller (20% and 44% respectively). This reflects the fact that a considerable proportion of online services and digital content is currently being provided for free. Nonetheless, survey results indicate that online services and digital content are used or accessed (instead of purchased) online at least once in the last 12 months at percentages comparable to the online purchases of tangible goods (93% for online services and 94% for digital content).* Data protection, payment security and consumer rights are key concerns in domestic ecommerce. * The average time online shoppers spent in total on their most recent online purchase was 3.1 hours. The three most preferred means of researching an online purchase were visiting online market places (42%), visiting seller or service provider websites (41%) and searching via a general search engine (38%).


Policy Implications as Stated By Author

The Commission’s DSM strategy that fosters the development of a fully integrated ecommerce environment across all EU28 Member States fits well within these trends, both in terms of timing and upcoming regulatory actions.


Coverage of Study

Coverage of Fundamental Issues
Issue Included within Study
Relationship between protection (subject matter/term/scope) and supply/economic development/growth/welfare
Green-tick.png
Relationship between creative process and protection - what motivates creators (e.g. attribution; control; remuneration; time allocation)?
Harmony of interest assumption between authors and publishers (creators and producers/investors)
Effects of protection on industry structure (e.g. oligopolies; competition; economics of superstars; business models; technology adoption)
Green-tick.png
Understanding consumption/use (e.g. determinants of unlawful behaviour; user-generated content; social media)
Coverage of Evidence Based Policies
Issue Included within Study
Nature and Scope of exclusive rights (hyperlinking/browsing; reproduction right)
Exceptions (distinguish innovation and public policy purposes; open-ended/closed list; commercial/non-commercial distinction)
Mass digitisation/orphan works (non-use; extended collective licensing)
Licensing and Business models (collecting societies; meta data; exchanges/hubs; windowing; crossborder availability)
Green-tick.png
Fair remuneration (levies; copyright contracts)
Enforcement (quantifying infringement; criminal sanctions; intermediary liability; graduated response; litigation and court data; commercial/non-commercial distinction; education and awareness)

Datasets

Sample size: 22,848
Level of aggregation: Consumer
Period of material under study: 2014-2015


Sample size: 1,054
Level of aggregation: Consumer
Period of material under study: 2014-2015