Hanway and Lyons (2003)

From Copyright EVIDENCE

Advertising Architectural Publishing of books, periodicals and other publishing Programming and broadcasting Computer programming Computer consultancy Creative, arts and entertainment Cultural education

Film and motion pictures Sound recording and music publishing Photographic activities PR and communication Software publishing (including video games) Specialised design Television programmes Translation and interpretation

1. Relationship between protection (subject matter/term/scope) and supply/economic development/growth/welfare 2. Relationship between creative process and protection - what motivates creators (e.g. attribution; control; remuneration; time allocation)? 3. Harmony of interest assumption between authors and publishers (creators and producers/investors) 4. Effects of protection on industry structure (e.g. oligopolies; competition; economics of superstars; business models; technology adoption) 5. Understanding consumption/use (e.g. determinants of unlawful behaviour; user-generated content; social media)

A. Nature and Scope of exclusive rights (hyperlinking/browsing; reproduction right) B. Exceptions (distinguish innovation and public policy purposes; open-ended/closed list; commercial/non-commercial distinction) C. Mass digitisation/orphan works (non-use; extended collective licensing) D. Licensing and Business models (collecting societies; meta data; exchanges/hubs; windowing; crossborder availability) E. Fair remuneration (levies; copyright contracts) F. Enforcement (quantifying infringement; criminal sanctions; intermediary liability; graduated response; litigation and court data; commercial/non-commercial distinction; education and awareness)

Source Details

Hanway and Lyons (2003)
Title: Teens OK With Letting Music Downloads Play
Author(s): Hanway, S, Lyons, L
Year: 2003
Citation: Hanway, S., & Lyons, L. (2003). Teens OK With Letting Music Downloads Play. Gallup Poll Tuesday Briefing, 97.
Link(s): Definitive , Open Access
Key Related Studies:
Discipline:
Linked by:
About the Data
Data Description: The Gallup Youth Survey is conducted via an Internet methodology provided by Knowledge Networks, using an online research panel that is designed to be representative of the entire U.S. population. The current questionnaire was completed by 517 respondents who had participated in the prior survey, aged 13 to 17.
Data Type: Primary data
Secondary Data Sources:
Data Collection Methods:
Data Analysis Methods:
Industry(ies):
Country(ies):
Cross Country Study?: No
Comparative Study?: No
Literature review?: No
Government or policy study?: No
Time Period(s) of Collection:
  • 1-29 August 2003
Funder(s):
  • Gallup

Abstract

Gallup Youth Survey of February 2003 had found 47% of teens saying they use the Internet for downloading music. Legal issues aside, Gallup wanted to know where teens stand on the morality of downloading music from the Internet without paying for it. In an August 2003 Gallup Youth Survey, 83% of teens (aged 13 to 17) said that it is morally acceptable to download music from the Internet for free. The August finding was part of a broader question asking teens about the moral acceptability of a number of items.

Main Results of the Study

  • 83% of teens (aged 13 to 17) said that it is morally acceptable to download music from the Internet for free.
  • Downloading free music was by far the item most likely to be deemed morally acceptable by teens, surpassing items such as divorce (which 67% of teens found morally acceptable), gambling (61% morally acceptable) and sex between an unmarried man and woman (57% morally acceptable).


Policy Implications as Stated By Author

  • Since the question did not explicitly mention copyrights or authorizations by the recording industry, some teens may have responded with the recognition that downloading free music per se is not a crime. On the other hand, it may simply be that teens do not feel an obligation to the music industry to pay for music.
  • The survey data suggest that teens may not be inclined to give music downloading voluntarily anytime soon, and any effort to curb downloads by teens will fall on parents, law enforcement, and the recording industry.



Coverage of Study

Coverage of Fundamental Issues
Issue Included within Study
Relationship between protection (subject matter/term/scope) and supply/economic development/growth/welfare
Relationship between creative process and protection - what motivates creators (e.g. attribution; control; remuneration; time allocation)?
Harmony of interest assumption between authors and publishers (creators and producers/investors)
Effects of protection on industry structure (e.g. oligopolies; competition; economics of superstars; business models; technology adoption)
Understanding consumption/use (e.g. determinants of unlawful behaviour; user-generated content; social media)
Green-tick.png
Coverage of Evidence Based Policies
Issue Included within Study
Nature and Scope of exclusive rights (hyperlinking/browsing; reproduction right)
Exceptions (distinguish innovation and public policy purposes; open-ended/closed list; commercial/non-commercial distinction)
Mass digitisation/orphan works (non-use; extended collective licensing)
Licensing and Business models (collecting societies; meta data; exchanges/hubs; windowing; crossborder availability)
Fair remuneration (levies; copyright contracts)
Enforcement (quantifying infringement; criminal sanctions; intermediary liability; graduated response; litigation and court data; commercial/non-commercial distinction; education and awareness)
Green-tick.png

Datasets

Sample size: 517
Level of aggregation: Teenagers
Period of material under study: 2003