IP Crime Annual Report (2012-2013)

From Copyright EVIDENCE

Advertising Architectural Publishing of books, periodicals and other publishing Programming and broadcasting Computer programming Computer consultancy Creative, arts and entertainment Cultural education

Film and motion pictures Sound recording and music publishing Photographic activities PR and communication Software publishing (including video games) Specialised design Television programmes Translation and interpretation

1. Relationship between protection (subject matter/term/scope) and supply/economic development/growth/welfare 2. Relationship between creative process and protection - what motivates creators (e.g. attribution; control; remuneration; time allocation)? 3. Harmony of interest assumption between authors and publishers (creators and producers/investors) 4. Effects of protection on industry structure (e.g. oligopolies; competition; economics of superstars; business models; technology adoption) 5. Understanding consumption/use (e.g. determinants of unlawful behaviour; user-generated content; social media)

A. Nature and Scope of exclusive rights (hyperlinking/browsing; reproduction right) B. Exceptions (distinguish innovation and public policy purposes; open-ended/closed list; commercial/non-commercial distinction) C. Mass digitisation/orphan works (non-use; extended collective licensing) D. Licensing and Business models (collecting societies; meta data; exchanges/hubs; windowing; crossborder availability) E. Fair remuneration (levies; copyright contracts) F. Enforcement (quantifying infringement; criminal sanctions; intermediary liability; graduated response; litigation and court data; commercial/non-commercial distinction; education and awareness)

Source Details

IP Crime Group (2013)
Title: IP Crime Annual Report (2012-2013)
Author(s): IP Crime Group
Year: 2013
Citation: IP Crime Group (2013). IP Crime Annual Report (2012-2013).
Link(s): Definitive , Open Access
Key Related Studies:
Discipline:
Linked by: IP Crime Annual Report (2013-2014), IP Crime Annual Report (2014-2015), IP Crime Annual Report (2015-2016), IP Crime Annual Report (2016-2017), IP Crime Annual Report (2017-2018)
About the Data
Data Description: The annual survey of Trading Standards (TS) work on IP crime was launched on 2 April 2013 and ran until 29 April 2013, covering the financial year 2012/13. The results of this chapter provide detailed information on the scale of IP crime, including the type and location of counterfeit goods investigated, as well as resources and training dedicated throughout authorities in their efforts to address the criminality. The chapter also offers an analysis of time trends, through comparison of this year’s survey responses to annual data from previous surveys. A total of 168 responses were received from authorities representing 12 geographical regions in the United Kingdom, this equates to a 66% increase in respondents to the previous year’s survey, which is very positive considering the changing landscape of trading standards over the past few years.

The charts and analysis that follow illustrate the most frequent answers given by participating authorities and, where possible, are compared year-on-year to the results of the 2009/10 - 2011/12 surveys.

Data Type: Primary data
Secondary Data Sources:
Data Collection Methods:
Data Analysis Methods:
Industry(ies):
Country(ies):
Cross Country Study?: No
Comparative Study?: No
Literature review?: No
Government or policy study?: Yes
Time Period(s) of Collection:
  • From 2 April 2013 to 29 April 2013
Funder(s):
  • Intellectual Property Office

Abstract

The annual IP Crime Report presents an overview of the initiatives and activities of industry, law enforcement agencies and Government Departments that are committed to tackling, investigating and reporting IP crime. This year has seen greater collaboration, with the structures detailed in the previous Report starting to see results - strategically as well as tactically on the ground with law enforcement activities. Key projects are coming to fruition and ongoing commitments by the IP community are keeping up the pressure on IP criminals. Last year’s IP Crime Report attracted an unprecedented amount of media coverage. It became clear that awareness of IP crime and efforts to detect and dismantle the criminality behind it were increasing, and the link between IP crime and other criminality was being realised. This year’s Report follows suit by presenting the views of IP Crime Group members and the wider community involved in IP and IP crime enforcement. Contributions for the Report have increased, and the commitment by Trading Standards Authorities to complete the annual IP Crime Survey have increased from 54% to 87% providing a clearer picture of their enforcement of IP crime.

Main Results of the Study

  • Over the past four years there has been a substantial rise of 27% in the amount of illicit alcohol being investigated by trading standards, highlighting the considerable response now being made to tackle the increasing availability of these potentially harmful products
  • Criminals are now using social media, and the wider web to sell illegal and unregulated goods. 64% of Trading Standards Authorities have investigated counterfeit goods on social media websites over the past financial year, and 69% have investigated websites.
  • The proportion of Trading Standard Authorities reporting investigations into counterfeit DVDs has dropped significantly, by 19.3%; investigations into counterfeit CDs has also dropped, by 14.6%. This could indicate a change in behaviour, as more individuals now use the internet to illegal download or stream music and film.
  • According to trading standards investigations, clothing continues to be the most heavily counterfeited products available, with 89.9% of authorities investigating incidents in 2012/13.
  • 74.3% of Trading Standards Authorities observed links between IP crime and benefit fraud, 45.7% saw links between money laundering and IP crime, and 42.9% identified links between IP crime and drug dealing.
  • 68.8% of Trading Standards Authorities reported that IP enforcement activity had either increased or stayed the same over the last year.
  • Clothing remains the most investigated item with 89.9% of responding authorities indicating that they had investigated this. This is despite the fact that the proportion of authorities examining counterfeit clothing has dropped by 5 percentage points on the last financial year. Investigations of alcohol have increased, with 78.6% of authorities investigating this good type, followed by DVDs at 60.7%, footwear at 60.1%, watches and jewellery at 56% and toiletries and cosmetics at 51.2%.


Policy Implications as Stated By Author

No policy implication stated



Coverage of Study

Coverage of Fundamental Issues
Issue Included within Study
Relationship between protection (subject matter/term/scope) and supply/economic development/growth/welfare
Relationship between creative process and protection - what motivates creators (e.g. attribution; control; remuneration; time allocation)?
Harmony of interest assumption between authors and publishers (creators and producers/investors)
Effects of protection on industry structure (e.g. oligopolies; competition; economics of superstars; business models; technology adoption)
Understanding consumption/use (e.g. determinants of unlawful behaviour; user-generated content; social media)
Green-tick.png
Coverage of Evidence Based Policies
Issue Included within Study
Nature and Scope of exclusive rights (hyperlinking/browsing; reproduction right)
Exceptions (distinguish innovation and public policy purposes; open-ended/closed list; commercial/non-commercial distinction)
Mass digitisation/orphan works (non-use; extended collective licensing)
Licensing and Business models (collecting societies; meta data; exchanges/hubs; windowing; crossborder availability)
Fair remuneration (levies; copyright contracts)
Enforcement (quantifying infringement; criminal sanctions; intermediary liability; graduated response; litigation and court data; commercial/non-commercial distinction; education and awareness)
Green-tick.png

Datasets

Sample size: 168
Level of aggregation: Authorities
Period of material under study: 2012-2013


Sample size: 10
Level of aggregation: Types of goods
Period of material under study: 2012-2013