IP Crime Annual Report (2016-2017)

From Copyright Evidence
Jump to: navigation, search

Advertising Architectural Publishing of books, periodicals and other publishing Programming and broadcasting Computer programming Computer consultancy Creative, arts and entertainment Cultural education

Film and motion pictures Sound recording and music publishing Photographic activities PR and communication Software publishing (including video games) Specialised design Television programmes Translation and interpretation

1. Relationship between protection (subject matter/term/scope) and supply/economic development/growth/welfare 2. Relationship between creative process and protection - what motivates creators (e.g. attribution; control; remuneration; time allocation)? 3. Harmony of interest assumption between authors and publishers (creators and producers/investors) 4. Effects of protection on industry structure (e.g. oligopolies; competition; economics of superstars; business models; technology adoption) 5. Understanding consumption/use (e.g. determinants of unlawful behaviour; user-generated content; social media)

A. Nature and Scope of exclusive rights (hyperlinking/browsing; reproduction right) B. Exceptions (distinguish innovation and public policy purposes; open-ended/closed list; commercial/non-commercial distinction) C. Mass digitisation/orphan works (non-use; extended collective licensing) D. Licensing and Business models (collecting societies; meta data; exchanges/hubs; windowing; crossborder availability) E. Fair remuneration (levies; copyright contracts) F. Enforcement (quantifying infringement; criminal sanctions; intermediary liability; graduated response; litigation and court data; commercial/non-commercial distinction; education and awareness)

Source Details

IP Crime Annual Report (2016-2017)
Title: IP Crime Annual Report (2016-2017)
Author(s): IP Crime Group
Year: 2017
Citation: IP Crime Group (2017) IP Crime Annual Report (2016-2017)
Link(s): Open Access
Key Related Studies:
Discipline:
Linked by:
About the Data
Data Description: The report consists of an amalgamation of different reports and information from various organisations, including law enforcement agencies (trading standards, police) and industry bodies (e.g. BPI). This is supplemented by a case studies from Trading Standards.
Data Type: Primary and Secondary data
Secondary Data Sources:
Data Collection Methods:
Data Analysis Methods:
Industry(ies):
Country(ies):
Cross Country Study?: No
Comparative Study?: No
Literature review?: No
Government or policy study?: Yes
Time Period(s) of Collection:
  • 2016-2017
Funder(s):
  • Intellectual Property Office

Abstract

“The Intellectual Property (IP) crime and enforcement report 2016 to 2017 highlights current and emerging threats surrounding counterfeiting and piracy, including those conducted online. The report also contains statistical data and enforcement activities from UK law enforcement agencies including Police, Trading Standards and Customs along with industry bodies. This year’s report includes a separate supplement with a sample of IP related case studies from Trading Standards.”

Main Results of the Study

The IPO finds that 15% of 6.7 million UK internet users consumed online content illegally between January and March 2017, a figure remaining consistent with rates over the same time period in 2016. FACT also report an increase in reports of online copyright infringement by approximately a third. Despite this, the Ministry of Justice only prosecuted 47 people during 2016, as opposed to 69 people in the previous year. The report cites certain deterrent effects for this low figure, including the prosecution for illegal downloading in R v Wayne Evans.

New and developing means of infringement are also on the rise. FACT reports the increasing use of IPTV and kodi boxes to watch copyright free material, with approximately 19% of adults engaging in this behaviour. PRS also report an increase in stream-ripping by a monumental 141.3%. They find this is primarily motivated by the fact music is already owned in another format (claimed by 31% of consumers) and a desire to listen to music offline (26%). The report also mentions 3D printing as a potential high-risk area, though notes further research is required in this regard.

Policy Implications as Stated By Author

No policy implications are stated by the authors.



Coverage of Study

Coverage of Fundamental Issues
Issue Included within Study
Relationship between protection (subject matter/term/scope) and supply/economic development/growth/welfare
Relationship between creative process and protection - what motivates creators (e.g. attribution; control; remuneration; time allocation)?
Harmony of interest assumption between authors and publishers (creators and producers/investors)
Effects of protection on industry structure (e.g. oligopolies; competition; economics of superstars; business models; technology adoption)
Understanding consumption/use (e.g. determinants of unlawful behaviour; user-generated content; social media)
Green-tick.png
Coverage of Evidence Based Policies
Issue Included within Study
Nature and Scope of exclusive rights (hyperlinking/browsing; reproduction right)
Exceptions (distinguish innovation and public policy purposes; open-ended/closed list; commercial/non-commercial distinction)
Mass digitisation/orphan works (non-use; extended collective licensing)
Licensing and Business models (collecting societies; meta data; exchanges/hubs; windowing; crossborder availability)
Fair remuneration (levies; copyright contracts)
Enforcement (quantifying infringement; criminal sanctions; intermediary liability; graduated response; litigation and court data; commercial/non-commercial distinction; education and awareness)
Green-tick.png

Datasets