Kwong and Park (2008)

From Copyright EVIDENCE

Advertising Architectural Publishing of books, periodicals and other publishing Programming and broadcasting Computer programming Computer consultancy Creative, arts and entertainment Cultural education

Film and motion pictures Sound recording and music publishing Photographic activities PR and communication Software publishing (including video games) Specialised design Television programmes Translation and interpretation

1. Relationship between protection (subject matter/term/scope) and supply/economic development/growth/welfare 2. Relationship between creative process and protection - what motivates creators (e.g. attribution; control; remuneration; time allocation)? 3. Harmony of interest assumption between authors and publishers (creators and producers/investors) 4. Effects of protection on industry structure (e.g. oligopolies; competition; economics of superstars; business models; technology adoption) 5. Understanding consumption/use (e.g. determinants of unlawful behaviour; user-generated content; social media)

A. Nature and Scope of exclusive rights (hyperlinking/browsing; reproduction right) B. Exceptions (distinguish innovation and public policy purposes; open-ended/closed list; commercial/non-commercial distinction) C. Mass digitisation/orphan works (non-use; extended collective licensing) D. Licensing and Business models (collecting societies; meta data; exchanges/hubs; windowing; crossborder availability) E. Fair remuneration (levies; copyright contracts) F. Enforcement (quantifying infringement; criminal sanctions; intermediary liability; graduated response; litigation and court data; commercial/non-commercial distinction; education and awareness)

Source Details

Kwong and Park (2008)
Title: Digital music services: consumer intention and adoption
Author(s): Kwong, S. W., Park, J.
Year: 2008
Citation: Kwong, S. W., & Park, J. (2008). Digital music services: consumer intention and adoption. The service industries journal, 28(10), 1463-1481.
Link(s): Definitive
Key Related Studies:
Discipline:
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About the Data
Data Description: 217 completed written surveys from Midwestern university students. Questions included surveyed about whether they have used DMS, the speed of their internet connections, the number of hours they go online, whether they play online games regularly (at least once a week), the number of hours they listen to music, whether they burn their downloaded music to CD, the storage size of their MP3 player, and whether they use instant messaging (IM) on a regular basis.
Data Type: Primary data
Secondary Data Sources:
Data Collection Methods:
Data Analysis Methods:
Industry(ies):
Country(ies):
Cross Country Study?: No
Comparative Study?: No
Literature review?:
Government or policy study?:
Time Period(s) of Collection:
Funder(s):
  • Not Stated

Abstract

In recent years, the popular channel to obtain record albums has shifted from purchasing compact discs to downloading MP3 files. In fact, digital music service (DMS), the industry that sells MP3 songs, has seen tremendous successes and is making hundreds of millions of dollars every year. However, few attempts have been made to understand the consumption behavior of this newly emerging market because it has its own characteristics that have made other behavioral models inapplicable. In this study, we surveyed college students, who are the most active in this market, concerning their DMS subscription behavior. A modified theory of planned behavior (TPB) model was used as the framework. This new model incorporates the technology acceptance model and a new construct, the perceived service quality, into the original TPB model. Based on the survey results, the present study depicts a model that explains subscription behavior and indicates that subjective norm has the most significant effect on the intention to subscribe. Also, features that potential subscribers found important are revealed. The results provide marketing implications for DMS providers and indicate possible direction for future studies.

Main Results of the Study

  • Family, friends, colleagues, and peers heavily influences individuals' behaviours and attitudes towards illegal downloading.
  • Members of the target demographic are willing to spend money on entertainment of sufficient perceived quality.
  • Legal downloading can be encouraged by emphasizing individuality and fashionability of desirable products.


Policy Implications as Stated By Author

Digital music service providers can influence consumer behaviour through marketing making legal downloading desirable and of high quality.



Coverage of Study

Coverage of Fundamental Issues
Issue Included within Study
Relationship between protection (subject matter/term/scope) and supply/economic development/growth/welfare
Relationship between creative process and protection - what motivates creators (e.g. attribution; control; remuneration; time allocation)?
Harmony of interest assumption between authors and publishers (creators and producers/investors)
Effects of protection on industry structure (e.g. oligopolies; competition; economics of superstars; business models; technology adoption)
Green-tick.png
Understanding consumption/use (e.g. determinants of unlawful behaviour; user-generated content; social media)
Coverage of Evidence Based Policies
Issue Included within Study
Nature and Scope of exclusive rights (hyperlinking/browsing; reproduction right)
Exceptions (distinguish innovation and public policy purposes; open-ended/closed list; commercial/non-commercial distinction)
Mass digitisation/orphan works (non-use; extended collective licensing)
Licensing and Business models (collecting societies; meta data; exchanges/hubs; windowing; crossborder availability)
Green-tick.png
Fair remuneration (levies; copyright contracts)
Enforcement (quantifying infringement; criminal sanctions; intermediary liability; graduated response; litigation and court data; commercial/non-commercial distinction; education and awareness)

Datasets

Sample size: 217
Level of aggregation: University students
Period of material under study: Not stated