Morrison and Secker (2015)

From Copyright EVIDENCE

Advertising Architectural Publishing of books, periodicals and other publishing Programming and broadcasting Computer programming Computer consultancy Creative, arts and entertainment Cultural education

Film and motion pictures Sound recording and music publishing Photographic activities PR and communication Software publishing (including video games) Specialised design Television programmes Translation and interpretation

1. Relationship between protection (subject matter/term/scope) and supply/economic development/growth/welfare 2. Relationship between creative process and protection - what motivates creators (e.g. attribution; control; remuneration; time allocation)? 3. Harmony of interest assumption between authors and publishers (creators and producers/investors) 4. Effects of protection on industry structure (e.g. oligopolies; competition; economics of superstars; business models; technology adoption) 5. Understanding consumption/use (e.g. determinants of unlawful behaviour; user-generated content; social media)

A. Nature and Scope of exclusive rights (hyperlinking/browsing; reproduction right) B. Exceptions (distinguish innovation and public policy purposes; open-ended/closed list; commercial/non-commercial distinction) C. Mass digitisation/orphan works (non-use; extended collective licensing) D. Licensing and Business models (collecting societies; meta data; exchanges/hubs; windowing; crossborder availability) E. Fair remuneration (levies; copyright contracts) F. Enforcement (quantifying infringement; criminal sanctions; intermediary liability; graduated response; litigation and court data; commercial/non-commercial distinction; education and awareness)

Source Details

Morrison and Secker (2015)
Title: Copyright Literacy in the UK: a survey of librarians and other cultural heritage sector professionals.
Author(s): Morrison C. and Secker J.
Year: 2015
Citation: Morrison, C. and Secker, J., 2015. Copyright Literacy in the UK: a survey of librarians and other cultural heritage sector professionals. Library and Information Research, 39(121), pp.75-97.
Link(s): Definitive , Open Access
Key Related Studies:
Discipline:
Linked by: Morrison and Secker (2017), Todorova et al. (2017)
About the Data
Data Description: The survey uses data collected from 613 responses to a questionnaire issued to Library and Cultural institution staff in the UK.
Data Type: Primary data
Secondary Data Sources:
Data Collection Methods:
Data Analysis Methods:
Industry(ies):
Country(ies):
Cross Country Study?: Yes
Comparative Study?: Yes
Literature review?: No
Government or policy study?: No
Time Period(s) of Collection:
  • 2014
Funder(s):

Abstract

Based on a survey of UK library and information professionals and those who work in the cultural heritage sector, carried out in December 2014, this research sought to examine the levels of copyright ‘literacy’. The survey aimed to obtain responses from all sectors, however most responses were received from academic libraries. The research examined their knowledge of national and international copyright issues as well as copyright policies at an institutional level. The survey also explored the need for copyright education for new and existing professionals and suggested topics for inclusion in training activities. The findings suggest that levels of knowledge amongst UK professionals are higher than those in other countries who participated in the first phase of the project. UK institutions are also more likely to have a copyright policy and an individual with responsibility for copyright. The results should be of interest to library managers, library educators and those with responsibility for staff training.

Main Results of the Study

The findings suggest that copyright should be embedded into the formal education and CPD of library and related professionals. Copyright clearly causes anxieties amongst some library staff who see themselves as taking on a role akin to providing legal advice. However, by viewing copyright as a key part of digital and information literacy, where the librarian‟s role is to empower learners and researchers through developing skills and behaviours to aid decision making, confidence in teaching about copyright and answering queries may improve. Library educators and those in CPD need to think carefully about how best to teach others about copyright to ensure it is both engaging and relevant. Meanwhile, librarians with their high levels of copyright literacy are in a strong position to work to embed copyright into the curriculum of courses at all levels.

Policy Implications as Stated By Author

The researchers recommend that further research is undertaken to gather more qualitative data to deepen the level of understanding about copyright literacy in the sector. It would also be useful to repeat the survey with other groups of professionals to enable comparisons to be made with, for example, senior managers in higher education, academics, other groups of administrative / professional services staff, educational developers, or e-learning staff.

Coverage of Study

Coverage of Fundamental Issues
Issue Included within Study
Relationship between protection (subject matter/term/scope) and supply/economic development/growth/welfare
Green-tick.png
Relationship between creative process and protection - what motivates creators (e.g. attribution; control; remuneration; time allocation)?
Harmony of interest assumption between authors and publishers (creators and producers/investors)
Green-tick.png
Effects of protection on industry structure (e.g. oligopolies; competition; economics of superstars; business models; technology adoption)
Green-tick.png
Understanding consumption/use (e.g. determinants of unlawful behaviour; user-generated content; social media)
Coverage of Evidence Based Policies
Issue Included within Study
Nature and Scope of exclusive rights (hyperlinking/browsing; reproduction right)
Exceptions (distinguish innovation and public policy purposes; open-ended/closed list; commercial/non-commercial distinction)
Green-tick.png
Mass digitisation/orphan works (non-use; extended collective licensing)
Green-tick.png
Licensing and Business models (collecting societies; meta data; exchanges/hubs; windowing; crossborder availability)
Green-tick.png
Fair remuneration (levies; copyright contracts)
Enforcement (quantifying infringement; criminal sanctions; intermediary liability; graduated response; litigation and court data; commercial/non-commercial distinction; education and awareness)

Datasets

Sample size: 613
Level of aggregation: Cultural Institution Staff
Period of material under study: 2014