Peace, Galletta and Thong (2003)

From Copyright EVIDENCE

Advertising Architectural Publishing of books, periodicals and other publishing Programming and broadcasting Computer programming Computer consultancy Creative, arts and entertainment Cultural education

Film and motion pictures Sound recording and music publishing Photographic activities PR and communication Software publishing (including video games) Specialised design Television programmes Translation and interpretation

1. Relationship between protection (subject matter/term/scope) and supply/economic development/growth/welfare 2. Relationship between creative process and protection - what motivates creators (e.g. attribution; control; remuneration; time allocation)? 3. Harmony of interest assumption between authors and publishers (creators and producers/investors) 4. Effects of protection on industry structure (e.g. oligopolies; competition; economics of superstars; business models; technology adoption) 5. Understanding consumption/use (e.g. determinants of unlawful behaviour; user-generated content; social media)

A. Nature and Scope of exclusive rights (hyperlinking/browsing; reproduction right) B. Exceptions (distinguish innovation and public policy purposes; open-ended/closed list; commercial/non-commercial distinction) C. Mass digitisation/orphan works (non-use; extended collective licensing) D. Licensing and Business models (collecting societies; meta data; exchanges/hubs; windowing; crossborder availability) E. Fair remuneration (levies; copyright contracts) F. Enforcement (quantifying infringement; criminal sanctions; intermediary liability; graduated response; litigation and court data; commercial/non-commercial distinction; education and awareness)

Source Details

Peace, Galletta and Thong (2003)
Title: Software piracy in the workplace: A model and empirical test
Author(s): Peace, A. G., Galletta, D. F., Thong, J. Y. L.
Year: 2003
Citation: Peace, A. G., Galletta, D. F., & Thong, J. Y. (2003). Software piracy in the workplace: A model and empirical test. Journal of Management Information Systems, 20(1), 153-177.
Link(s): Open Access
Key Related Studies:
Discipline:
Linked by: Huang, Zhu and Liu (2007)
About the Data
Data Description: A preliminary questionnaire was distributed to five experts in the academic field and a sample of ten IS professionals. After the items were slightly modified via feedback, the instrument was pilot tested on 38 individuals, resulting in further minor changes. The final version was reviewed by five academic and five practitioner experts as to the instrument’s clarity and validity.

The final survey was conducted on a sample of working class adults taking evening classes in the part-time MBA program of a mid-Atlantic US university. Of the 264 questionnaires distributed, 203 were returned completed. The final sample consisted of 201 completed questionnaires.

61% of the respondents were male and the mean age was 29.1 years. All respondents had completed a Bachelors level degree. 96% used computers on a daily basis.

Data Type: Primary data
Secondary Data Sources:
Data Collection Methods:
Data Analysis Methods:
Industry(ies):
Country(ies):
Cross Country Study?: No
Comparative Study?: No
Literature review?: No
Government or policy study?: No
Time Period(s) of Collection:
  • Not Stated
Funder(s):

Abstract

Theft of software and other intellectual property has become one of the most visible problems in computing today. This paper details the development and empirical validation of a model of software piracy by individuals in the workplace. The model was developed from the results of prior research into software piracy, and the reference disciplines of the theory of planned behavior, expected utility theory, and deterrence theory. A survey of 201 respondents was used to test the model. The results indicate that individual attitudes, subjective norms, and perceived behavioral control are significant precursors to the intention to illegally copy software. In addition, punishment severity, punishment certainty, and software cost have direct effects on the individual’s attitude toward software piracy, whereas punishment certainty has a significant effect on perceived behavioral control. Consequently, strategies to reduce software piracy should focus on these factors. The results add to a growing stream of information systems research into illegal software copying behavior and have significant implications for organizations and industry groups aiming to reduce software piracy.

Main Results of the Study

  • 52% of the total sample admitted to illegally copying software at least once a year. 59.2% stated they had copied software illegally at least once. Only 6.5% indicated they knew someone who had been caught.
  • For organizations, the results imply that the factors identified by TPB can be manipulated to yield the desired effects.
  • The strength of the relationship between punishment certainty and perceived behavioral control indicates that the more likely an individual perceives the chance of being caught, the less the individual perceives himself or herself as having the ability to commit software policy.
  • Software cost also plays an important role in modifying the individual’s attitude toward piracy. The lower the cost, the less gain if it is illegally copied; by contrast, if it is very expensive, the perceived benefits of purchasing the software may be outweighed by its cost.
  • Attitude toward software piracy is clearly the strongest predictor of software piracy intention. Perceived behavioral control had the last impact on piracy intention in the proposed model.


Policy Implications as Stated By Author

  • Influencing individuals’ attitudes toward software piracy can reinforce the subjective norms of their peers. Individuals whose peers view software piracy as unethical or illegal tend to believe similarly that the act of software piracy is not ethical or legal, and will be less likely to commit the crime.
  • Organizations intent on eliminating illegal software copying within their ranks should consider instituting (and publicizing) significant punishments.



Coverage of Study

Coverage of Fundamental Issues
Issue Included within Study
Relationship between protection (subject matter/term/scope) and supply/economic development/growth/welfare
Relationship between creative process and protection - what motivates creators (e.g. attribution; control; remuneration; time allocation)?
Harmony of interest assumption between authors and publishers (creators and producers/investors)
Effects of protection on industry structure (e.g. oligopolies; competition; economics of superstars; business models; technology adoption)
Understanding consumption/use (e.g. determinants of unlawful behaviour; user-generated content; social media)
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Coverage of Evidence Based Policies
Issue Included within Study
Nature and Scope of exclusive rights (hyperlinking/browsing; reproduction right)
Exceptions (distinguish innovation and public policy purposes; open-ended/closed list; commercial/non-commercial distinction)
Mass digitisation/orphan works (non-use; extended collective licensing)
Licensing and Business models (collecting societies; meta data; exchanges/hubs; windowing; crossborder availability)
Fair remuneration (levies; copyright contracts)
Enforcement (quantifying infringement; criminal sanctions; intermediary liability; graduated response; litigation and court data; commercial/non-commercial distinction; education and awareness)
Green-tick.png

Datasets

Sample size: 201
Level of aggregation: Individual
Period of material under study: Not Stated