Taylor (2012)

From Copyright EVIDENCE

Advertising Architectural Publishing of books, periodicals and other publishing Programming and broadcasting Computer programming Computer consultancy Creative, arts and entertainment Cultural education

Film and motion pictures Sound recording and music publishing Photographic activities PR and communication Software publishing (including video games) Specialised design Television programmes Translation and interpretation

1. Relationship between protection (subject matter/term/scope) and supply/economic development/growth/welfare 2. Relationship between creative process and protection - what motivates creators (e.g. attribution; control; remuneration; time allocation)? 3. Harmony of interest assumption between authors and publishers (creators and producers/investors) 4. Effects of protection on industry structure (e.g. oligopolies; competition; economics of superstars; business models; technology adoption) 5. Understanding consumption/use (e.g. determinants of unlawful behaviour; user-generated content; social media)

A. Nature and Scope of exclusive rights (hyperlinking/browsing; reproduction right) B. Exceptions (distinguish innovation and public policy purposes; open-ended/closed list; commercial/non-commercial distinction) C. Mass digitisation/orphan works (non-use; extended collective licensing) D. Licensing and Business models (collecting societies; meta data; exchanges/hubs; windowing; crossborder availability) E. Fair remuneration (levies; copyright contracts) F. Enforcement (quantifying infringement; criminal sanctions; intermediary liability; graduated response; litigation and court data; commercial/non-commercial distinction; education and awareness)

Source Details

Taylor (2012)
Title: Evaluating digital piracy intentions on behaviors
Author(s): Taylor, S. A.
Year: 2012
Citation: Taylor, S. A. (2012). Evaluating digital piracy intentions on behaviors. Journal of Services Marketing, 26(7), 472-483.
Link(s): Definitive
Key Related Studies:
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About the Data
Data Description: The sample represents a cross section of students from across all major campus disciplines of a Midwestern university in the USA. A total of 321 respondents accepted the invitation to participate in the study. Respondents visited an on-campus computer laboratory where they completed a survey delivered through an interactive custom computer program developed specifically for the study. At a second stage, a group of 267 university students participated in an enhanced version of the survey.
Data Type: Primary data
Secondary Data Sources:
Data Collection Methods:
Data Analysis Methods:
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Cross Country Study?: No
Comparative Study?: No
Literature review?: No
Government or policy study?: No
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Abstract

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to assess how well digital piracy self-report intentions predict actual digital piracy behaviors in service marketing research.


Design/methodology/approach – Study 1 collects 321 surveys to investigate potential measurement issues related to digital piracy intention formation. Study 2 replicates Study 1 based on a separate sample of 267 respondents, and additionally links digital piracy intentions to directly observed digital piracy behaviors across a peer-to-peer network.

Findings – The results first validate a strong predictive relationship between self-report intentions and observed digital piracy behaviors (R2 ¼ 0:36). Second, common method bias and measurement error do not appear to threaten the veracity of reported results. Third, a social psychological model of how digital piracy behaviors emerge is validated based upon the folk theory of the mind. Finally, a two-dimensional conceptualization of frequency of past behaviors is identified based upon exploratory factor analysis using structural equation modeling.

Research limitations/implications – The research reported here relies on experimental methods of measuring peer-to-peer network activity. Future research might consider the motivational and attitudinal antecedents to digital piracy intention formation.

Practical implications – The results afford service marketers assurance that self-report measures of digital piracy behavioral intentions can serve as predictive measures of future behaviors. This helps make the collection of data in this context both achievable and practical. Also, a methodological framework is identified to strengthen measurement models associated with this type of research.

Originality/value – The research provides a first effort to empirically relate behavioral intention data to unobtrusively observed digital piracy behaviors across peer-to-peer networks.

Main Results of the Study

This article aims at a twofold analysis of primary data in order to assess how well digital piracy self-report intentions predict actual digital piracy behaviors in service marketing research. The analysis shows that:

  • There is a strong predictive relationship between digital piracy intention formation and subsequent behaviors.
  • The relative contributions of the desire to engage in digital piracy behaviors and ‘frequency’ reported by Taylor et al. (2009) are validated in two independent samples.
  • Evidence of substantial undetected digital piracy was identified in this study suggesting that much of the activity occurs outside of internet-based peer-to-peer networks.

Policy Implications as Stated By Author

Reliance on self-report measures of gigital piracy behavioral intentions can serve as predictive measures of behaviors. For example, the recent anti-piracy advertising campaign identified by Sweeney (2010) could conduct pre- and post-advertising exposure studies with self-reports of behavioral intentions to assess their impact.



Coverage of Study

Coverage of Fundamental Issues
Issue Included within Study
Relationship between protection (subject matter/term/scope) and supply/economic development/growth/welfare
Relationship between creative process and protection - what motivates creators (e.g. attribution; control; remuneration; time allocation)?
Harmony of interest assumption between authors and publishers (creators and producers/investors)
Effects of protection on industry structure (e.g. oligopolies; competition; economics of superstars; business models; technology adoption)
Understanding consumption/use (e.g. determinants of unlawful behaviour; user-generated content; social media)
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Coverage of Evidence Based Policies
Issue Included within Study
Nature and Scope of exclusive rights (hyperlinking/browsing; reproduction right)
Exceptions (distinguish innovation and public policy purposes; open-ended/closed list; commercial/non-commercial distinction)
Mass digitisation/orphan works (non-use; extended collective licensing)
Licensing and Business models (collecting societies; meta data; exchanges/hubs; windowing; crossborder availability)
Fair remuneration (levies; copyright contracts)
Enforcement (quantifying infringement; criminal sanctions; intermediary liability; graduated response; litigation and court data; commercial/non-commercial distinction; education and awareness)
Green-tick.png

Datasets

Sample size: 321
Level of aggregation: University students
Period of material under study: Not stated


Sample size: 267
Level of aggregation: University students
Period of material under study: Not stated