Danahar, Smith and Teland (2015)

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Advertising Architectural Publishing of books, periodicals and other publishing Programming and broadcasting Computer programming Computer consultancy Creative, arts and entertainment Cultural education

Film and motion pictures Sound recording and music publishing Photographic activities PR and communication Software publishing (including video games) Specialised design Television programmes Translation and interpretation

1. Relationship between protection (subject matter/term/scope) and supply/economic development/growth/welfare 2. Relationship between creative process and protection - what motivates creators (e.g. attribution; control; remuneration; time allocation)? 3. Harmony of interest assumption between authors and publishers (creators and producers/investors) 4. Effects of protection on industry structure (e.g. oligopolies; competition; economics of superstars; business models; technology adoption) 5. Understanding consumption/use (e.g. determinants of unlawful behaviour; user-generated content; social media)

A. Nature and Scope of exclusive rights (hyperlinking/browsing; reproduction right) B. Exceptions (distinguish innovation and public policy purposes; open-ended/closed list; commercial/non-commercial distinction) C. Mass digitisation/orphan works (non-use; extended collective licensing) D. Licensing and Business models (collecting societies; meta data; exchanges/hubs; windowing; crossborder availability) E. Fair remuneration (levies; copyright contracts) F. Enforcement (quantifying infringement; criminal sanctions; intermediary liability; graduated response; litigation and court data; commercial/non-commercial distinction; education and awareness)

Source Details

Danahar, Smith and Teland (2015)
Title: 'Copyright Enforcement in the Digital Age: Emprical Evidence and Conclusions’
Author(s): Danahar, B., Smith, M., Teland, R.
Year: 2015
Citation: Danahar, B., Smith, M., Teland, R.,'Copyright Enforcement in the Digital Age: Empirical Evidence and Conclusions', WIPO/ACE/10/20, 2015
Link(s): Definitive , Open Access
Key Related Studies:
Discipline:
Linked by:
About the Data
Data Description: Data from 13 studies comparing levels of copyright infringement (piracy) and sales of copyright works before and after the introduction of anti-piracy policies
Data Type: Secondary data
Secondary Data Sources:
Data Collection Methods:
Data Analysis Methods:
Industry(ies):
Country(ies):
Cross Country Study?: Yes
Comparative Study?: Yes
Literature review?: Yes
Government or policy study?: Yes
Time Period(s) of Collection:
  • 1999 to 2015
Funder(s):
  • WIPO

Abstract

The digitization of media goods weakened the effective strength of copyright policy by allowing widespread sharing of media files over the Internet, forcing governments to consider how to reform copyright policy to reflect the digital era and forcing firms to consider new strategies in order to compete with online piracy. This paper reviews the economic evidence on the effectiveness of various government antipiracy interventions as well as firm strategies aimed at mitigating piracy’s impact. By synthesizing the results of various studies, we provide insights on the principles that drive the degree of success or failure of various antipiracy policies. This study should be of value to policymakers and rightsholders considering copyright reform initiatives, and also to researchers looking for guidance toward what questions remain important but unanswered by current academic literature.

Main Results of the Study

  • Antipiracy efforts are most effective when both government and firms take action to deter piracy and promote legal content.
  • Further studies are necessary to determine the optimal amount of government enforcement.


Policy Implications as Stated By Author

  • Examines the effectiveness of government antipiracy interventions
  • Piracy levels have been found to drop most significantly when two things occur - it is more convenient to access content via legitimate methods such as subscription streaming services, and illegal downloading is much less convenient due to the threat of punitive action
  • Antipiracy methods should therefore provide greater access to content by legal methods at the same time as targeting the illegal methods



Coverage of Study

Coverage of Fundamental Issues
Issue Included within Study
Relationship between protection (subject matter/term/scope) and supply/economic development/growth/welfare
Green-tick.png
Relationship between creative process and protection - what motivates creators (e.g. attribution; control; remuneration; time allocation)?
Harmony of interest assumption between authors and publishers (creators and producers/investors)
Effects of protection on industry structure (e.g. oligopolies; competition; economics of superstars; business models; technology adoption)
Understanding consumption/use (e.g. determinants of unlawful behaviour; user-generated content; social media)
Green-tick.png
Coverage of Evidence Based Policies
Issue Included within Study
Nature and Scope of exclusive rights (hyperlinking/browsing; reproduction right)
Exceptions (distinguish innovation and public policy purposes; open-ended/closed list; commercial/non-commercial distinction)
Mass digitisation/orphan works (non-use; extended collective licensing)
Licensing and Business models (collecting societies; meta data; exchanges/hubs; windowing; crossborder availability)
Fair remuneration (levies; copyright contracts)
Enforcement (quantifying infringement; criminal sanctions; intermediary liability; graduated response; litigation and court data; commercial/non-commercial distinction; education and awareness)
Green-tick.png

Datasets

Sample size: 13
Level of aggregation: Studies
Period of material under study: 1999 to 2015