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|Title=Survey of Canadian Authors on Educational Copying
 
|Title=Survey of Canadian Authors on Educational Copying
 
|Year=2013
 
|Year=2013
|Full Citation=The Writers’ Union of Canada (2013) Survey of Canadian Authors on Educational Copying. Available: https://www.writersunion.ca/survey-canadian-authors-educational-copying [last accessed 29 May 2019]
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|Full Citation=The Writers’ Union of Canada (2013) Survey of Canadian Authors on Educational Copying. Available: https://www.writersunion.ca/survey-canadian-authors-educational-copying (last accessed 29 May 2019)
 
|Abstract=“Is the copying of up to 10% of a published work, entire chapters, stories, poems and articles for use in educational course packs fair? Are educational institutions excused from the responsibility of seeking permission for, and paying for such large amounts of educational copying? Has Canadian society, with its new Copyright Act, really reached a new consensus on educational copying? The results of this survey of Canada’s professional writers leave us with no doubt – there is no new consensus on educational copying.”
 
|Abstract=“Is the copying of up to 10% of a published work, entire chapters, stories, poems and articles for use in educational course packs fair? Are educational institutions excused from the responsibility of seeking permission for, and paying for such large amounts of educational copying? Has Canadian society, with its new Copyright Act, really reached a new consensus on educational copying? The results of this survey of Canada’s professional writers leave us with no doubt – there is no new consensus on educational copying.”
 
|Link=https://www.writersunion.ca/survey-canadian-authors-educational-copying
 
|Link=https://www.writersunion.ca/survey-canadian-authors-educational-copying

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Advertising Architectural Publishing of books, periodicals and other publishing Programming and broadcasting Computer programming Computer consultancy Creative, arts and entertainment Cultural education

Film and motion pictures Sound recording and music publishing Photographic activities PR and communication Software publishing (including video games) Specialised design Television programmes Translation and interpretation

1. Relationship between protection (subject matter/term/scope) and supply/economic development/growth/welfare 2. Relationship between creative process and protection - what motivates creators (e.g. attribution; control; remuneration; time allocation)? 3. Harmony of interest assumption between authors and publishers (creators and producers/investors) 4. Effects of protection on industry structure (e.g. oligopolies; competition; economics of superstars; business models; technology adoption) 5. Understanding consumption/use (e.g. determinants of unlawful behaviour; user-generated content; social media)

A. Nature and Scope of exclusive rights (hyperlinking/browsing; reproduction right) B. Exceptions (distinguish innovation and public policy purposes; open-ended/closed list; commercial/non-commercial distinction) C. Mass digitisation/orphan works (non-use; extended collective licensing) D. Licensing and Business models (collecting societies; meta data; exchanges/hubs; windowing; crossborder availability) E. Fair remuneration (levies; copyright contracts) F. Enforcement (quantifying infringement; criminal sanctions; intermediary liability; graduated response; litigation and court data; commercial/non-commercial distinction; education and awareness)

Source Details

The Writers’ Union of Canada (2013)
Title: Survey of Canadian Authors on Educational Copying
Author(s): The Writers’ Union of Canada
Year: 2013
Citation: The Writers’ Union of Canada (2013) Survey of Canadian Authors on Educational Copying. Available: https://www.writersunion.ca/survey-canadian-authors-educational-copying (last accessed 29 May 2019)
Link(s): Open Access
Key Related Studies:
Discipline:
Linked by:
About the Data
Data Description: Data were obtained from a survey of authors belonging to The Writers’ Union of Canada, with a total of 581 respondents (29.05% response rate). The survey was designed to gather opinions regarding fair dealing in education.
Data Type: Primary data
Secondary Data Sources:
Data Collection Methods:
Data Analysis Methods:
Industry(ies):
Country(ies):
Cross Country Study?: No
Comparative Study?: No
Literature review?: No
Government or policy study?: No
Time Period(s) of Collection:
  • 30 April 2013 - 10 May 2013
Funder(s):

Abstract

“Is the copying of up to 10% of a published work, entire chapters, stories, poems and articles for use in educational course packs fair? Are educational institutions excused from the responsibility of seeking permission for, and paying for such large amounts of educational copying? Has Canadian society, with its new Copyright Act, really reached a new consensus on educational copying? The results of this survey of Canada’s professional writers leave us with no doubt – there is no new consensus on educational copying.”

Main Results of the Study

The majority of authors believe that copying large amounts of published work for free is unfair (86%), and that incomes will suffer due to this allowance in education (83%). The report highlights that many of the respondents also have formal ties to the education system in Canada, whether as a student or teacher (combined 70%), suggesting that even a strong connection to the education system does not change their opinion of what is fair. Many authors also disagree with educational “fair use” policies that allow for e.g. copying of 10% of a work, a chapter, an entire poem etc. (equating a roughly 30/70 split on each point).

Many of the authors surveyed are a member of the collective licensing agency Access Copyright (87.1%), with authors earning an average of $1,018 ($350 median) in revenues from this agency. Revenues collected outwith this are reportedly much lower, with the majority of respondents earning $150 in payment (median earnings $250). Irrespective of whether authors are members of an active affiliation (such as Access Copyright) the majority of authors still maintain a belief that large amounts of copying for free is unfair (83% of non-members and 86% of those unsure of membership); the report suggests that this notion of unfairness is therefore unconnected to the presence of any potential income or exposure to activism.

Policy Implications as Stated By Author

The report concludes that fair compensation for educational copying is required to maintain the writing, publishing, reading and learning system. Current school, college and university policies on “fair dealing” allowances may be misinformed, and require further research given that many respondents (themselves based in education) believe they are unfair.



Coverage of Study

Coverage of Fundamental Issues
Issue Included within Study
Relationship between protection (subject matter/term/scope) and supply/economic development/growth/welfare
Green-tick.png
Relationship between creative process and protection - what motivates creators (e.g. attribution; control; remuneration; time allocation)?
Harmony of interest assumption between authors and publishers (creators and producers/investors)
Effects of protection on industry structure (e.g. oligopolies; competition; economics of superstars; business models; technology adoption)
Understanding consumption/use (e.g. determinants of unlawful behaviour; user-generated content; social media)
Coverage of Evidence Based Policies
Issue Included within Study
Nature and Scope of exclusive rights (hyperlinking/browsing; reproduction right)
Exceptions (distinguish innovation and public policy purposes; open-ended/closed list; commercial/non-commercial distinction)
Mass digitisation/orphan works (non-use; extended collective licensing)
Licensing and Business models (collecting societies; meta data; exchanges/hubs; windowing; crossborder availability)
Fair remuneration (levies; copyright contracts)
Green-tick.png
Enforcement (quantifying infringement; criminal sanctions; intermediary liability; graduated response; litigation and court data; commercial/non-commercial distinction; education and awareness)

Datasets