Difference between revisions of "The Writers’ Union of Canada (2015)"

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|Title=Devaluing Creators, Endangering Creativity. Doing More and Making Less: Writers’ Incomes Today
 
|Title=Devaluing Creators, Endangering Creativity. Doing More and Making Less: Writers’ Incomes Today
 
|Year=2015
 
|Year=2015
|Full Citation=The Writers’ Union of Canada (2015) Devaluing Creators, Endangering Creativity. Doing More and Making Less: Writers’ Incomes Today. Available: https://www.writersunion.ca/sites/all/files/DevaluingCreatorsEndangeringCreativity_0.pdf#overlay-context=news/canadian-writers-working-harder-while-earning-less [last accessed: 29 May 2019]
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|Full Citation=The Writers’ Union of Canada (2015) Devaluing Creators, Endangering Creativity. Doing More and Making Less: Writers’ Incomes Today. Available: https://www.writersunion.ca/sites/all/files/DevaluingCreatorsEndangeringCreativity_0.pdf#overlay-context=news/canadian-writers-working-harder-while-earning-less (last accessed: 29 May 2019)
 
|Abstract=“Following up on the 1998 survey of writers’ incomes conducted by The Writers’ Union of Canada (TWUC) and Quill and Quire, along with recent surveys of authors’ earnings in the UK and US, The Writers’ Union of Canada undertook an income survey of its members and other writers in the spring of 2015. The survey was circulated to Union members and other writers through their organizations and social media. The conclusions are discouraging:  
 
|Abstract=“Following up on the 1998 survey of writers’ incomes conducted by The Writers’ Union of Canada (TWUC) and Quill and Quire, along with recent surveys of authors’ earnings in the UK and US, The Writers’ Union of Canada undertook an income survey of its members and other writers in the spring of 2015. The survey was circulated to Union members and other writers through their organizations and social media. The conclusions are discouraging:  
 
• Today’s writer does more to earn less. Taking inflation into account, writers are making 27% less than they were making in 1998 from their writing, while 45% of writers say they must do more to earn a living now.
 
• Today’s writer does more to earn less. Taking inflation into account, writers are making 27% less than they were making in 1998 from their writing, while 45% of writers say they must do more to earn a living now.

Latest revision as of 11:40, 12 July 2019

Advertising Architectural Publishing of books, periodicals and other publishing Programming and broadcasting Computer programming Computer consultancy Creative, arts and entertainment Cultural education

Film and motion pictures Sound recording and music publishing Photographic activities PR and communication Software publishing (including video games) Specialised design Television programmes Translation and interpretation

1. Relationship between protection (subject matter/term/scope) and supply/economic development/growth/welfare 2. Relationship between creative process and protection - what motivates creators (e.g. attribution; control; remuneration; time allocation)? 3. Harmony of interest assumption between authors and publishers (creators and producers/investors) 4. Effects of protection on industry structure (e.g. oligopolies; competition; economics of superstars; business models; technology adoption) 5. Understanding consumption/use (e.g. determinants of unlawful behaviour; user-generated content; social media)

A. Nature and Scope of exclusive rights (hyperlinking/browsing; reproduction right) B. Exceptions (distinguish innovation and public policy purposes; open-ended/closed list; commercial/non-commercial distinction) C. Mass digitisation/orphan works (non-use; extended collective licensing) D. Licensing and Business models (collecting societies; meta data; exchanges/hubs; windowing; crossborder availability) E. Fair remuneration (levies; copyright contracts) F. Enforcement (quantifying infringement; criminal sanctions; intermediary liability; graduated response; litigation and court data; commercial/non-commercial distinction; education and awareness)

Source Details

The Writers’ Union of Canada (2015)
Title: Devaluing Creators, Endangering Creativity. Doing More and Making Less: Writers’ Incomes Today
Author(s): The Writers’ Union of Canada
Year: 2015
Citation: The Writers’ Union of Canada (2015) Devaluing Creators, Endangering Creativity. Doing More and Making Less: Writers’ Incomes Today. Available: https://www.writersunion.ca/sites/all/files/DevaluingCreatorsEndangeringCreativity_0.pdf#overlay-context=news/canadian-writers-working-harder-while-earning-less (last accessed: 29 May 2019)
Link(s): Open Access
Key Related Studies:
Discipline:
Linked by: Burgess and De Rosa (2017)
About the Data
Data Description: Data were obtained from a survey of 947 authors belonging to The Writers’ Union of Canada.
Data Type: Primary data
Secondary Data Sources:
Data Collection Methods:
Data Analysis Methods:
Industry(ies):
Country(ies):
Cross Country Study?: No
Comparative Study?: No
Literature review?: No
Government or policy study?: No
Time Period(s) of Collection:
  • Spring 2015
Funder(s):

Abstract

“Following up on the 1998 survey of writers’ incomes conducted by The Writers’ Union of Canada (TWUC) and Quill and Quire, along with recent surveys of authors’ earnings in the UK and US, The Writers’ Union of Canada undertook an income survey of its members and other writers in the spring of 2015. The survey was circulated to Union members and other writers through their organizations and social media. The conclusions are discouraging: • Today’s writer does more to earn less. Taking inflation into account, writers are making 27% less than they were making in 1998 from their writing, while 45% of writers say they must do more to earn a living now.

• The work of writers fuels an almost 2 billion dollar industry, and yet more than 80% earn an income from their writing that is below the poverty line.

• Women, who represent the majority in the industry, earn 55% of the income male writers do.

These results represent a cultural emergency for Canadians. If we want a strong and diverse publishing and cultural industry, it is essential that creators are reasonably and fairly compensated.”

Main Results of the Study

Since 1998, authors’ wages have decreased by 27% to give an average income of $12,879 and median income of less than $5,000, resulting in 81% of respondents earning wages below the poverty line. Overall, women earn 55% of that earned by male counterparts, increasing to 49% for female authors who write as their primary occupation.

Royalties from publishers remain the main source of writing revenue for authors (46%), followed by corporate, financial and governmental writing (14%), and revenue from self-publications (8%). However, 45% of authors still report doing more to earn a living today than in 2011.

Policy Implications as Stated By Author

The report concludes that authors’ current wages are unsustainable, and may result in abandonment of the profession. As such, the report stresses the need to ensure fair compensation for author’s works, ensured through fair contractual agreements, and with adequately funded support from support facilities.



Coverage of Study

Coverage of Fundamental Issues
Issue Included within Study
Relationship between protection (subject matter/term/scope) and supply/economic development/growth/welfare
Green-tick.png
Relationship between creative process and protection - what motivates creators (e.g. attribution; control; remuneration; time allocation)?
Harmony of interest assumption between authors and publishers (creators and producers/investors)
Effects of protection on industry structure (e.g. oligopolies; competition; economics of superstars; business models; technology adoption)
Understanding consumption/use (e.g. determinants of unlawful behaviour; user-generated content; social media)
Coverage of Evidence Based Policies
Issue Included within Study
Nature and Scope of exclusive rights (hyperlinking/browsing; reproduction right)
Exceptions (distinguish innovation and public policy purposes; open-ended/closed list; commercial/non-commercial distinction)
Mass digitisation/orphan works (non-use; extended collective licensing)
Licensing and Business models (collecting societies; meta data; exchanges/hubs; windowing; crossborder availability)
Fair remuneration (levies; copyright contracts)
Green-tick.png
Enforcement (quantifying infringement; criminal sanctions; intermediary liability; graduated response; litigation and court data; commercial/non-commercial distinction; education and awareness)

Datasets