Difference between revisions of "Thomes (2013)"

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|Source={{Source
 
|Source={{Source
 
|Name of Study=Thomes (2013)
 
|Name of Study=Thomes (2013)
|Author=Tim Paul Thomes
+
|Author=Thomes, T. P.
 
|Title=An economic analysis of online streaming music services
 
|Title=An economic analysis of online streaming music services
 
|Year=2011
 
|Year=2011
 
|Full Citation=Thomes, Tim Paul. An economic analysis of online streaming music services. Information Economics and Policy 25.2 (2013): 81-91.
 
|Full Citation=Thomes, Tim Paul. An economic analysis of online streaming music services. Information Economics and Policy 25.2 (2013): 81-91.
 
|Abstract=Streaming music services represent the music industry’s greatest prospective source of revenue and are well established among consumers. This paper presents a theory of a streaming music business model consisting of two types of services provided by a monopolist. The first service, which offers access free of charge, is of low quality and financed by advertising. The second service charges its users and is of high quality. The analysis demonstrates that if users are highly tolerant of commercials, the monopolist benefits from advertising funding and hence charges a high price to users of the fee-based service to boost demand for the advertising supported service. The analysis addresses the welfare consequences of such a business model and shows it is an effective policy for combating digital piracy.
 
|Abstract=Streaming music services represent the music industry’s greatest prospective source of revenue and are well established among consumers. This paper presents a theory of a streaming music business model consisting of two types of services provided by a monopolist. The first service, which offers access free of charge, is of low quality and financed by advertising. The second service charges its users and is of high quality. The analysis demonstrates that if users are highly tolerant of commercials, the monopolist benefits from advertising funding and hence charges a high price to users of the fee-based service to boost demand for the advertising supported service. The analysis addresses the welfare consequences of such a business model and shows it is an effective policy for combating digital piracy.
|Discipline=D4: Market Structure and Pricing, D42: Monopoly, L1: Market Structure; Firm Strategy; and Market Performance, L12: Monopoly • Monopolization Strategies, L8: Industry Studies: Services, L82: Entertainment • Media
+
|Authentic Link=http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0167624513000103
|Cross-country=No
+
|Link=http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0167624513000103
|Comparative=No
+
|Reference=Liebowitz (2006a); Peitz and Waelbroeck (2004); Resinger (2012);
 +
|Plain Text Proposition=* This paper examines a monopolistic streaming music business model with two vertically differentiated types of services.
 +
* The low-quality service offers free access and is advertising based, while the high-quality service is fee based.
 +
* High tolerance of advertising benefits the monopolist and harms users.
 +
* Launching both types of services never leads to a socially desirable outcome.
 +
* Such a streaming music business model may be an effective means to combat digital piracy.
 +
|FundamentalIssue=1. Relationship between protection (subject matter/term/scope) and supply/economic development/growth/welfare, 4. Effects of protection on industry structure (e.g. oligopolies; competition; economics of superstars; business models; technology adoption), 2. Relationship between creative process and protection - what motivates creators (e.g. attribution; control; remuneration; time allocation)?,
 +
|EvidenceBasedPolicy=D. Licensing and Business models (collecting societies; meta data; exchanges/hubs; windowing; crossborder availability),
 +
|Discipline=D42: Monopoly, L12: Monopoly • Monopolization Strategies, L82: Entertainment • Media
 +
|Intervention-Response=* Streaming music services such as the 'two-tier fremium' model can act as effective mitigation of digital piracy.
 +
* A successful streaming service is likely to have a monopoly or near-monopoly but the provision of different services to different consumer markets by vertically bisecting the service (into free and advertising supported and high quality advertising free subscription models) means that there is still a choice for the consumer.
 +
|Description of Data=This study analyses the usage of two types of streaming music service: a free-to-use model with advertising and a premium subscription model. The study uses sales data from 2009 to 2011 from the International Federation of Phonographic Industries to assess the effects of the music streaming service models on music piracy.
 +
|Data Year=2009-2011
 +
|Data Type=Secondary data
 +
|Data Source=IFPI (2011);
 +
|Method of Collection=Quantitative Collection Methods, Quantitative data/text mining, Qualitative Collection Methods, Case Study
 +
|Method of Analysis=Quantitative Analysis Methods, Quantitative content analysis (e.g. text or data mining)
 +
|Industry=Sound recording and music publishing;
 +
|Country=European Union; United States;
 +
|Cross-country=Yes
 +
|Comparative=Yes
 
|Government or policy=No
 
|Government or policy=No
 
|Literature review=No
 
|Literature review=No
 
}}
 
}}
|Dataset=
+
|Dataset={{Dataset
 +
|Sample Size=2
 +
|Level of Aggregation=Music streaming services,
 +
|Data Material Year=2009-2011
 +
}}
 
}}
 
}}

Latest revision as of 17:42, 12 January 2017

Advertising Architectural Publishing of books, periodicals and other publishing Programming and broadcasting Computer programming Computer consultancy Creative, arts and entertainment Cultural education

Film and motion pictures Sound recording and music publishing Photographic activities PR and communication Software publishing (including video games) Specialised design Television programmes Translation and interpretation

1. Relationship between protection (subject matter/term/scope) and supply/economic development/growth/welfare 2. Relationship between creative process and protection - what motivates creators (e.g. attribution; control; remuneration; time allocation)? 3. Harmony of interest assumption between authors and publishers (creators and producers/investors) 4. Effects of protection on industry structure (e.g. oligopolies; competition; economics of superstars; business models; technology adoption) 5. Understanding consumption/use (e.g. determinants of unlawful behaviour; user-generated content; social media)

A. Nature and Scope of exclusive rights (hyperlinking/browsing; reproduction right) B. Exceptions (distinguish innovation and public policy purposes; open-ended/closed list; commercial/non-commercial distinction) C. Mass digitisation/orphan works (non-use; extended collective licensing) D. Licensing and Business models (collecting societies; meta data; exchanges/hubs; windowing; crossborder availability) E. Fair remuneration (levies; copyright contracts) F. Enforcement (quantifying infringement; criminal sanctions; intermediary liability; graduated response; litigation and court data; commercial/non-commercial distinction; education and awareness)

Source Details

Thomes (2013)
Title: An economic analysis of online streaming music services
Author(s): Thomes, T. P.
Year: 2011
Citation: Thomes, Tim Paul. An economic analysis of online streaming music services. Information Economics and Policy 25.2 (2013): 81-91.
Link(s): Definitive , Open Access
Key Related Studies:
Discipline:
Linked by:
About the Data
Data Description: This study analyses the usage of two types of streaming music service: a free-to-use model with advertising and a premium subscription model. The study uses sales data from 2009 to 2011 from the International Federation of Phonographic Industries to assess the effects of the music streaming service models on music piracy.
Data Type: Secondary data
Secondary Data Sources:
Data Collection Methods:
Data Analysis Methods:
Industry(ies):
Country(ies):
Cross Country Study?: Yes
Comparative Study?: Yes
Literature review?: No
Government or policy study?: No
Time Period(s) of Collection:
  • 2009-2011
Funder(s):

Abstract

Streaming music services represent the music industry’s greatest prospective source of revenue and are well established among consumers. This paper presents a theory of a streaming music business model consisting of two types of services provided by a monopolist. The first service, which offers access free of charge, is of low quality and financed by advertising. The second service charges its users and is of high quality. The analysis demonstrates that if users are highly tolerant of commercials, the monopolist benefits from advertising funding and hence charges a high price to users of the fee-based service to boost demand for the advertising supported service. The analysis addresses the welfare consequences of such a business model and shows it is an effective policy for combating digital piracy.

Main Results of the Study

  • This paper examines a monopolistic streaming music business model with two vertically differentiated types of services.
  • The low-quality service offers free access and is advertising based, while the high-quality service is fee based.
  • High tolerance of advertising benefits the monopolist and harms users.
  • Launching both types of services never leads to a socially desirable outcome.
  • Such a streaming music business model may be an effective means to combat digital piracy.


Policy Implications as Stated By Author

  • Streaming music services such as the 'two-tier fremium' model can act as effective mitigation of digital piracy.
  • A successful streaming service is likely to have a monopoly or near-monopoly but the provision of different services to different consumer markets by vertically bisecting the service (into free and advertising supported and high quality advertising free subscription models) means that there is still a choice for the consumer.



Coverage of Study

Coverage of Fundamental Issues
Issue Included within Study
Relationship between protection (subject matter/term/scope) and supply/economic development/growth/welfare
Green-tick.png
Relationship between creative process and protection - what motivates creators (e.g. attribution; control; remuneration; time allocation)?
Green-tick.png
Harmony of interest assumption between authors and publishers (creators and producers/investors)
Effects of protection on industry structure (e.g. oligopolies; competition; economics of superstars; business models; technology adoption)
Green-tick.png
Understanding consumption/use (e.g. determinants of unlawful behaviour; user-generated content; social media)
Coverage of Evidence Based Policies
Issue Included within Study
Nature and Scope of exclusive rights (hyperlinking/browsing; reproduction right)
Exceptions (distinguish innovation and public policy purposes; open-ended/closed list; commercial/non-commercial distinction)
Mass digitisation/orphan works (non-use; extended collective licensing)
Licensing and Business models (collecting societies; meta data; exchanges/hubs; windowing; crossborder availability)
Green-tick.png
Fair remuneration (levies; copyright contracts)
Enforcement (quantifying infringement; criminal sanctions; intermediary liability; graduated response; litigation and court data; commercial/non-commercial distinction; education and awareness)

Datasets

Sample size: 2
Level of aggregation: Music streaming services
Period of material under study: 2009-2011