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(Created page with "{{MainSource |Source={{Source |Name of Study=The Authors Guild (2015) |Author=The Authors Guild |Title=The Wages of Writing: Key Findings from the Authors Guild 2015 Member Su...")
 
 
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|Title=The Wages of Writing: Key Findings from the Authors Guild 2015 Member Survey
 
|Title=The Wages of Writing: Key Findings from the Authors Guild 2015 Member Survey
 
|Year=2015
 
|Year=2015
|Full Citation=The Authors Guild (2015) The Wages of Writing: Key Findings from the Authors Guild 2015 Member Survey. Available: https://www.authorsguild.org/industry-advocacy/the-wages-of-writing/ [last accessed: 24 May 2019]
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|Full Citation=The Authors Guild (2015) The Wages of Writing: Key Findings from the Authors Guild 2015 Member Survey. Available: https://www.authorsguild.org/industry-advocacy/the-wages-of-writing/ (last accessed: 24 May 2019)
 
|Abstract=“Earlier this year, we conducted our first member survey since 2009. Overall, the survey results showed that author incomes are down, hybrid authorship is up, and authors are spending more time marketing than ever before. In short, the business of authorship is both more varied and less profitable than just six years ago.”
 
|Abstract=“Earlier this year, we conducted our first member survey since 2009. Overall, the survey results showed that author incomes are down, hybrid authorship is up, and authors are spending more time marketing than ever before. In short, the business of authorship is both more varied and less profitable than just six years ago.”
 
|Link=https://www.authorsguild.org/industry-advocacy/the-wages-of-writing/
 
|Link=https://www.authorsguild.org/industry-advocacy/the-wages-of-writing/

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Advertising Architectural Publishing of books, periodicals and other publishing Programming and broadcasting Computer programming Computer consultancy Creative, arts and entertainment Cultural education

Film and motion pictures Sound recording and music publishing Photographic activities PR and communication Software publishing (including video games) Specialised design Television programmes Translation and interpretation

1. Relationship between protection (subject matter/term/scope) and supply/economic development/growth/welfare 2. Relationship between creative process and protection - what motivates creators (e.g. attribution; control; remuneration; time allocation)? 3. Harmony of interest assumption between authors and publishers (creators and producers/investors) 4. Effects of protection on industry structure (e.g. oligopolies; competition; economics of superstars; business models; technology adoption) 5. Understanding consumption/use (e.g. determinants of unlawful behaviour; user-generated content; social media)

A. Nature and Scope of exclusive rights (hyperlinking/browsing; reproduction right) B. Exceptions (distinguish innovation and public policy purposes; open-ended/closed list; commercial/non-commercial distinction) C. Mass digitisation/orphan works (non-use; extended collective licensing) D. Licensing and Business models (collecting societies; meta data; exchanges/hubs; windowing; crossborder availability) E. Fair remuneration (levies; copyright contracts) F. Enforcement (quantifying infringement; criminal sanctions; intermediary liability; graduated response; litigation and court data; commercial/non-commercial distinction; education and awareness)

Source Details

The Authors Guild (2015)
Title: The Wages of Writing: Key Findings from the Authors Guild 2015 Member Survey
Author(s): The Authors Guild
Year: 2015
Citation: The Authors Guild (2015) The Wages of Writing: Key Findings from the Authors Guild 2015 Member Survey. Available: https://www.authorsguild.org/industry-advocacy/the-wages-of-writing/ (last accessed: 24 May 2019)
Link(s): Open Access
Key Related Studies:
Discipline:
Linked by:
About the Data
Data Description: Data were gathered via a survey of Authors Guild Members, with 1,674 complete responses.
Data Type: Primary data
Secondary Data Sources:
Data Collection Methods:
Data Analysis Methods:
Industry(ies):
Country(ies):
Cross Country Study?: No
Comparative Study?: No
Literature review?: No
Government or policy study?: No
Time Period(s) of Collection:
  • 2015
Funder(s):
  • The Authors Guild

Abstract

“Earlier this year, we conducted our first member survey since 2009. Overall, the survey results showed that author incomes are down, hybrid authorship is up, and authors are spending more time marketing than ever before. In short, the business of authorship is both more varied and less profitable than just six years ago.”

Main Results of the Study

Full-time authors have experienced a 30% decrease in average earnings since 2009, reducing from $25,000 to $17,500 annually, with part-time authors experiencing a slightly steeper decrease of 38%, from $7,250 in 2009 to $4,500 annually. Full-time authors with 15+ years of experience saw the greatest declines in income, with authors in the 25-40 age bracket experiencing a 67% decrease from $28,750 to $9,500 annually. The report attributes this decrease to a multitude of factors, including an increased uptake in eBooks (and corresponding eBook piracy) and a “free” economy which seemingly justifies free excerpts and other means of remuneration. As a consequence, 39% of authors need to subsidise their writing profession with other sources of income. Elsewhere, 33% of have self-published their books, demonstrating a “hybrid” approach to publishing that avoids the use of the less diverse, and increasingly multinationally corporate, publishing industry.

Policy Implications as Stated By Author

The report concludes that overall the picture of authors’ incomes is “not pretty”, and that copyright law and policy should be adjusted to place authors’ concerns at the forefront, though does not offer any specific suggestions.



Coverage of Study

Coverage of Fundamental Issues
Issue Included within Study
Relationship between protection (subject matter/term/scope) and supply/economic development/growth/welfare
Green-tick.png
Relationship between creative process and protection - what motivates creators (e.g. attribution; control; remuneration; time allocation)?
Harmony of interest assumption between authors and publishers (creators and producers/investors)
Effects of protection on industry structure (e.g. oligopolies; competition; economics of superstars; business models; technology adoption)
Understanding consumption/use (e.g. determinants of unlawful behaviour; user-generated content; social media)
Coverage of Evidence Based Policies
Issue Included within Study
Nature and Scope of exclusive rights (hyperlinking/browsing; reproduction right)
Exceptions (distinguish innovation and public policy purposes; open-ended/closed list; commercial/non-commercial distinction)
Mass digitisation/orphan works (non-use; extended collective licensing)
Licensing and Business models (collecting societies; meta data; exchanges/hubs; windowing; crossborder availability)
Fair remuneration (levies; copyright contracts)
Green-tick.png
Enforcement (quantifying infringement; criminal sanctions; intermediary liability; graduated response; litigation and court data; commercial/non-commercial distinction; education and awareness)

Datasets