Bmrb Social Research (2009)

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Advertising Architectural Publishing of books, periodicals and other publishing Programming and broadcasting Computer programming Computer consultancy Creative, arts and entertainment Cultural education

Film and motion pictures Sound recording and music publishing Photographic activities PR and communication Software publishing (including video games) Specialised design Television programmes Translation and interpretation

1. Relationship between protection (subject matter/term/scope) and supply/economic development/growth/welfare 2. Relationship between creative process and protection - what motivates creators (e.g. attribution; control; remuneration; time allocation)? 3. Harmony of interest assumption between authors and publishers (creators and producers/investors) 4. Effects of protection on industry structure (e.g. oligopolies; competition; economics of superstars; business models; technology adoption) 5. Understanding consumption/use (e.g. determinants of unlawful behaviour; user-generated content; social media)

A. Nature and Scope of exclusive rights (hyperlinking/browsing; reproduction right) B. Exceptions (distinguish innovation and public policy purposes; open-ended/closed list; commercial/non-commercial distinction) C. Mass digitisation/orphan works (non-use; extended collective licensing) D. Licensing and Business models (collecting societies; meta data; exchanges/hubs; windowing; crossborder availability) E. Fair remuneration (levies; copyright contracts) F. Enforcement (quantifying infringement; criminal sanctions; intermediary liability; graduated response; litigation and court data; commercial/non-commercial distinction; education and awareness)

Source Details

BMRB Social Research (2009)
Title: Future copyright development
Author(s): BMRB Social Research
Year: 2009
Citation: BMRB Social Research. (2009). Future copyright development. Intellectual Property Office, UK.
Link(s): Definitive , Open Access
Key Related Studies:
Discipline:
Linked by:
About the Data
Data Description: Two waves of research were held in London, Manchester, Glasgow and Cardiff between 3rd and 12th March 2009.

A total of 83 participants took part, from the following groups: members of the public; small to medium sized enterprises (SMEs) comprising users as well as those engaged in rights clearance processes; and representatives from the creative industries. In the first wave of research, participants were convened in single groups: with separate workshops for the public, SMEs and creatives respectively. For the second wave, participants were reconvened in mixed groups, to share perspectives on copyright issues.

Data Type: Primary data
Secondary Data Sources:
Data Collection Methods:
Data Analysis Methods:
Industry(ies):
Country(ies):
Cross Country Study?: No
Comparative Study?: No
Literature review?: No
Government or policy study?: Yes
Time Period(s) of Collection:
  • 2009
Funder(s):
  • IPO

Abstract

This project engaged rights holders and users in a review of the copyright system to help set an agenda for future copyright policy Four copyright areas were explored: access to works; recognition around creative input; incentivising investment and creativity; and authenticating and protecting works. Two waves of research were held in London, Manchester, Glasgow and Cardiff between 3rd and 12th March 2009. A total of 83 participants took part, from the following groups: members of the public; small to medium sized enterprises (SMEs) comprising users as well as those engaged in rights clearance processes; and representatives from the creative industries. In the first wave of research, participants were convened in single groups: with separate workshops for the public, SMEs and creatives respectively. For the second wave, participants were reconvened in mixed groups, to share perspectives on copyright issues.

Main Results of the Study

The study reports 10 main findings:

  • Access to works valued but needs to be made simpler.
  • There is a need to treat different types of users differently.
  • Communicating messages about infringement and creating online norms was important for public groups.
  • The public were willing to pay for works online under certain conditions. Low price and ease of access all important.
  • Developing standards and structures to facilitate legal copyright use was important for creative and SME groups.
  • Creatives and rights holders need to take greater responsibility for visibility on works.
  • Greater scope needs to be given to creatives to have more control over the use of their works - too much power often resided with commercial rights holders.
  • Greater financial and legal support needed to be given to creators to redress copyright infringement – penalties should fit the crime.
  • ISPs need to play a greater role in policing enforcement. Technologies can also play a key role in tracking use and preventing misuse.
  • Setting a clear vision and policy framework for copyright was an important role for government. Delivery should be left to the private sector.

Policy Implications as Stated By Author

This study makes many policy recommendations: "The ultimate objective of the research was to help set a clear agenda for future copyright policy that will feed into discussions at EU and wider international levels."

The findings of the research are effectively policy recommendations, however, the following statement is representative of the overarching theme of the document...

"Government’s role in future copyright development needs to be strategic and policy orientated. Participants were wary of the unintended consequences of well meaning legislation. There was a need for leadership around the principles and standards for copyright. Ultimately, government need to help create the environment to encourage the private sector to deliver the products and services to deliver value for creators and user alike."

Coverage of Study

Coverage of Fundamental Issues
Issue Included within Study
Relationship between protection (subject matter/term/scope) and supply/economic development/growth/welfare
Green-tick.png
Relationship between creative process and protection - what motivates creators (e.g. attribution; control; remuneration; time allocation)?
Harmony of interest assumption between authors and publishers (creators and producers/investors)
Effects of protection on industry structure (e.g. oligopolies; competition; economics of superstars; business models; technology adoption)
Green-tick.png
Understanding consumption/use (e.g. determinants of unlawful behaviour; user-generated content; social media)
Green-tick.png
Coverage of Evidence Based Policies
Issue Included within Study
Nature and Scope of exclusive rights (hyperlinking/browsing; reproduction right)
Exceptions (distinguish innovation and public policy purposes; open-ended/closed list; commercial/non-commercial distinction)
Mass digitisation/orphan works (non-use; extended collective licensing)
Green-tick.png
Licensing and Business models (collecting societies; meta data; exchanges/hubs; windowing; crossborder availability)
Fair remuneration (levies; copyright contracts)
Green-tick.png
Enforcement (quantifying infringement; criminal sanctions; intermediary liability; graduated response; litigation and court data; commercial/non-commercial distinction; education and awareness)
Green-tick.png

Datasets

Sample size: 83
Level of aggregation: Individual
Period of material under study: 2009