Copyright Evidence

From Copyright EVIDENCE
Welcome to the Copyright Evidence Wiki
The open platform that collects evidence about copyright's role in society
757 studies have been fully catalogued

Introduction

Copyright Evidence is a digital resource developed by the CREATe Centre at the University of Glasgow. The aim of the Wiki is to construct a complete catalogue of existing empirical evidence relevant to copyright policy in order to inform public debate. The evidence is coded by many categories, including country, industry, funder and research method, offering an in-depth view of existing findings. The codes can be explored using the semantic drilldown function.

Browse by Industry:
Book on.png Books Broadcasting on.png Broadcasting Education on.png Education Film on.png Films

Blue square.png All industries

Music on.png Music Photography on.png Photography Software on.png Software Television on.png Television
Browse by year:

1970, 1972, 1982, 1984, 1985, 1986, 1988, 1989, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019

Browse by policy issue:
A. Nature and Scope of exclusive rights This field includes papers that examine policy issues related to the types of works that are eligible for copyright protection and the extent of the protection offered by exclusive rights and moral rights. Among others, the papers included under this category focus on the originality threshold, derivative works, hyperlinking, news aggregation, resale and community norms (including negative space).

B. Exceptions

This field includes papers that examine policy issues related to whether materials which otherwise are subject to exclusive copyright protection should be available for justifiable use without seeking permission and whether existing exceptions and limitations facilitate creative and scientific progress. Among others, the papers included under this category distinguish exceptions and limitations for the purposes of innovation or public policy, open-ended provisions from closed lists, and commercial and non-commercial uses.

C. Mass digitisation/orphan works

This field includes papers that examine policy issues related to the process that enable mass digitisation of copyright protected content. Among others, the papers included under this category focus on potential solutions for orphan works and non-use of cultural works, including licensing schemes and extended collective licensing, and the application of copyright in cultural heritage institutions.

D. Licensing and Business models

This field includes papers that examine policy issues related to strategies and licensing solutions in the exploitation of copyright protected materials, and how legal markets attempt to match production to consumption. Among others, the papers included under this category examine collecting societies, metadata, copyright exchanges and hubs, windowing, crossborder access, open access/open science and end-user licensing.

E. Fair remuneration

This field includes papers that examine policy issues related to creators’ or rightholders’ earnings. Among others, the papers included under this category focus on the sources of artistic income, royalty flows, contracts, levies and sales displacement.

F. Enforcement

This field includes papers that examine policy issues related to the optimal way to enforce the private right of copyright. Among others, the papers included under this category focus on quantifying infringement, motivations for infringement, technological measures of protection, intermediary liability, graduated responses, notice and takedowns, criminal sanctions, litigation and court data.
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Editorial Board
Prof. Martin Kretschmer (chair), University of Glasgow
Assoc. Prof. Kristofer Erickson (co-chair), University of Leeds
Dr Kenneth Barr, University of Glasgow
Prof. Giorgio Fazio, Newcastle University
Dr Heather Ford, UNSW, Sydney
Assoc. Prof. Rebecca Giblin, University of Melbourne
Prof. Paul Heald, University of Illinois
Dr Thomas Margoni, University of Glasgow
Assoc. Prof. Joost Poort, University of Amsterdam
Fred Saunderson, National Library of Scotland
Prof. Ruth Towse, Bournemouth University & CREATe
Amy Thomas (sub-editor), University of Glasgow

More information can be found on the About page and in the FAQs.

How to use and cite The Copyright Evidence Wiki

Most of the original content on the Copyright Evidence Wiki website is distributed under a CC BY-SA 3.0 licence, meaning that you can share, remix, alter and build upon the Copyright Evidence Wiki content for any purpose as long as you credit the author of the content and redistribute your contributions under the same licence. Where content on the Copyright Evidence Wiki is not distributed under a CC BY-SA 3.0 licence, this will be indicated clearly.

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Please cite the resource in the following way:

The Copyright Evidence Wiki: Empirical Evidence for Copyright Policy. CREATe Centre: University of Glasgow (http://CopyrightEvidence.org)

Please include the date when the resource was accessed.

If referring to the earlier version archived with GitHub [1] in January 2018, we suggest that the resource is cited in the following way: Koutmeridis, T., Erickson, K. & Kretschmer, M. (eds.) (2014-2017) The Copyright Evidence Wiki: Empirical Evidence for Copyright Policy.

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